Susan Tedeschi Joins John Prine For Powerhouse ‘Color Of The Blues’ Performance [Watch]

first_imgLegendary country music artist John Prine has just announced a new album! Titled For Better, Or Worse, the new release will see Prine team up with a number of extraordinary female musicians for a series of rockin’ duets. Due out on September 30th, the artists who are featured on the album include Miranda Lambert, Kacey Musgraves, Lee Ann Womack, Iris DeMent, Holly Williams, Morgane Stapleton, Kathy Mattea, Alison Krauss, Amanda Shires and his wife, Fiona Prine.The only woman left off of that list is Susan Tedeschi, who is not only featured on the album but on the leading single as well. Tedeschi joins Prine for a reworking of George Jones’ “Color Of The Blues,” which you can stream in full while watching the album preview video below.For more information about the new album, you can head here. Check out the tracklisting below.For Better, Or Worse Tracklisting1. Who’s Gonna Take the Garbage Out (feat. Iris Dement)2. Storms Never Last (feat. Lee Ann Womack)3. Falling in Love Again (feat. Allison Krauss)4. Color of the Blues (feat. Susan Tedeschi)5. I’m Tellin’ You (feat. Holly Williams)6. Remember Me (When Candlelights Are Gleaming) [feat. Kathy Mattea]7. Look at Us (feat. Morgane Stapleton)8. Dim Lights, Thick Smoke, and Loud, Loud Music (feat. Amanda Shires)9. Fifteen Years Ago (feat. Lee Ann Womack)10. Cold, Cold Heart (feat. Miranda Lambert)11. Dreaming My Dreams with You (feat. Kathy Mattea)12. Mental Cruelty (feat. Kacey Musgraves)13. Mr. & Mrs. Used to Be (feat. Iris Dement)14. My Happiness (feat. Fiona Prine)15. Just Waitin’last_img read more

UK regulator suggests new scheme-sponsor separation mechanism

first_imgThe scheme is poised to enter the PPF, with benefit cuts of 10% for members who have not yet retired.RAA deals have also been struck in full or in principle with Halcrow and Tata Steel UK, but in these cases the arrangement involved the creation of a new scheme that will operate outside the PPF.In TPR’s mind the proposed new mechanism would be separate from and additional to its power to wind up a scheme when it becomes clear the scheme may never be able to meet its funding obligations.On its wind-up power, TPR called for these to be revisited “to allow us to take into account all our objectives which are relevant to DB when considering to exercise it”.In its response to the government’s DB green paper, the regulator also called for more powers in relation to scheme funding and information gathering, and for the requirement for a trustee board chair’s statement to be extended to DB and hybrid schemes.“Being able to set clearer standards and to shift our dynamic with all of our regulated community so that we can monitor against those standards on an ongoing basis, not just when a breach is detected, is essential to our being a more proactive regulator,” it saidIn relation to scheme funding, TPR advocated it being given the power to set binding standards in detailed codes or guidance, supported by a legally enforceable “comply or explain” regime.The regulator also said there was a case for more powers to encourage employers to make higher deficit repair contributions where they can afford to do so.TPR called for more comprehensive interview and inspection powers for information-gathering purposes, and the ability to impose civil penalties in addition to criminal penalties for non-compliance with information requests.On consolidation, TPR said it supported a voluntary approach. Extending the requirement for a trustee board chair’s statement combined with a legal requirement for trustees to update on what they are doing to control costs could provide a significant impetus, it added. The UK pensions regulator has floated the idea of allowing stressed pension schemes to be separated from the employer on the basis of scheme viability rather than the risk of employer insolvency.Responding to the government’s review of defined benefit (DB) scheme regulation, the Pensions Regulator (TPR) said it might “be worth exploring” whether there was room for a mechanism allowing for such a separation.Currently, UK law allows for a sponsoring employer to cut its financial obligations to a scheme if this would avoid the company becoming insolvent. The statutory mechanism for this is a regulated apportionment arrangement (RAA), which must be approved by TPR and the Pension Protection Fund (PPF) and satisfy certain conditions.RAAs are rare, but have grabbed headlines in the past few months. The UK arm of household appliances company Hoover agreed an RAA , which was at risk of insolvency as a result of the funding needs of the pension scheme.last_img read more