Jerry Garcia And Merl Saunders Cover “(I’m A) Road Runner” In This Newly Released Recording

first_imgOn July 28th, the two-disc Garcia Live Volume Nine will be released, featuring previously unheard recordings from Jerry Garcia and Merl Saunders during a performance on August 11th, 1974 at the Keystone in Berkeley, California. With Jerry Garcia on guitar and vocals, and Merl Saunders on keys and vocals, the band was rounded out by Martin Fierro on sax and flute, John Kahn on bass, and Bill Kreutzmann on drums—a group that later became Legion of Mary sans Kreutzmann and with Ron Tutt on drums instead.Jerry Garcia 75th Birthday Concert Series AnnouncedAhead of Garcia Live Volume Nine‘s release, tracks off the upcoming album have been slowly rolled out to preview the record. Yesterday, “(I’m A) Road Runner” was officially released to the public and premiered via Grateful Web. “(I’m A) Road Runner” is a cover of Junior Walker’s 1966 Motown classic and was regularly performed over the years by Garcia with his various solo projects. This latest track off Garcia Live Volume Nine comes after the release of performances of Jimmy Cliff’s “The Harder They Come” and “Ain’t No Woman (Like The One I’ve Got)” from the August 11th, 1974 Keystone show.You can listen to all three tracks below. You can also pre-order Garcia Live Volume Nine here ahead of its official release later in the month. Garcia Live Volume Nine Track ListingDisc One/Set OneThat’s What Love Will Make You DoLa LaIt Ain’t No UseMystery TrainDisc Two/Set TwoThe Harder They ComeAin’t No Woman (Like The One I’ve Got)It’s Too Late(I’m A) Road RunnerThe Night They Drove Old Dixie Down[H/T JamBase]last_img read more

Australia rocked by late wickets after Bangladesh post 260

first_imgDHAKA (Reuters) – Australia bowled out Bangladesh for 260 and then suffered a spectacular top-order collapse of their own to leave them reeling at 18 for three after the spin-dominated opening day of the first Test on Sunday.On a day of fluctuating fortunes, Bangladesh slumped to 10-3 before Shakib Al Hasan and Tamim Iqbal raised 155 runs to help them post a competitive total at the Shere Bangla National Stadium.Australia witnessed a similar collapse in their reply and slumped to 14-3 as Bangladesh roared back into the contest in the eventful final session when eight wickets fell.Matt Renshaw was batting on six at stumps with skipper Steve Smith on three. Australia now face a daunting task on a spin-friendly track where slow bowlers have claimed nine of the 13 wickets that fell on the opening day.After opting to bat, Bangladesh were left gasping for breath after Pat Cummins reduced them to 10-3 inside four overs with a terrific display of fast bowling.The paceman gave an indication of things to come with his third delivery, which flew off the shoulder of Soumya Sarkar’s blade and soared over the agitated slip fielders.Two balls later, the batsman was caught in the gully by Peter Handscomb.Cummins returned to have Imrul Kayes and Sabbir Rahman off successive deliveries, the leaden-footed batsmen perishing caught behind without scoring.With two left-handers at the crease, Smith pressed off-spinner Nathan Lyon into service but Shakib and Tamim, playing their 50th tests, refused to retreat into a defensive shell and batted positively.Both batsmen used their feet against the spinners, steadying the innings and reaching half-centuries in the process.Glenn Maxwell’s part-time off-spin finally earned Australia the breakthrough with Tamim lobbing one to David Warner at backward point to fall for a 71 which included three sixes off Lyon’s bowling.Lyon then claimed the important wicket of Shakib with an extra bit of bounce from the track when the batsman edged him to Smith in the slips. Shakib’s 84 included 11 boundaries.Australia’s spin duo of Lyon (3-79) and Ashton Agar (3-46) shared six wickets between them to bowl out the hosts for a modest total.The strong start Australia expected from their openers, however, did not materialise.Warner fell lbw to Mehedy Hasan for eight, a delivery after successfully reviewing and overturning a similar leg-before appeal.Usman Khawaja then ran himself out chasing a non-existent single and nightwatchman Lyon fell lbw to Shakib to further complicate Australia’s crisis.BANGLADESH 1st inningsTamim Iqbal c Warner b Maxwell 71Soumya Sarkar c Handscomb b Cummins 8Imrul Kayes c Wade b Cummins 0Sabbir Rahman c Wade b Cummins 0Shakib Al Hasan c Smith b Lyon 84Mushfiqur Rahim lbw b Agar 18Nasir Hossain lbw b Agar 23Mehidy Hasan c Handscomb b Lyon 18Taijul Islam lbw b Lyon 4Shafiul Islam c Hazlewood b Agar 13Mustafizur Rahman not out 0Extras (b-15 lb-3 nb-2 w-1) 21Total (all out, 78.5 overs) 260Fall of wickets: 1-10 S. Sarkar,2-10 I. Kayes,3-10 Sa. Rahman,4-165 T. Iqbal,5-188 S. Al Hasan,6-198 M. Rahim,7-240 M. Hasan,8-246 Nas. Hossain,9-246 T. Islam,10-260 Sh. IslamBowling: J. Hazlewood 15 – 5 – 39 – 0, P. Cummins 16 – 1 – 63 – 3(nb-2 w-1),N. Lyon 30 – 6 – 79 – 3, A. Agar 12.5 – 2 – 46 – 3,G. Maxwell 5 – 0 – 15 – 1.AUSTRALIA 1st inningsD. Warner lbw b M. Hasan 8M. Renshaw not out 6U. Khawaja run out (Rahim, Sarkar) 1N. Lyon lbw b Al Hasan 0S. Smith not out 3Extras 0Total (for 3 wickets, 9 overs) 18Fall of wickets: 1-9 D. Warner,2-14 U. Khawaja,3-14 N. LyonTo bat: P. Handscomb, G. Maxwell, M. Wade, A. Agar, P. Cummins, J. HazlewoodBowling: Shafiul Islam 2 – 0 – 8 – 0, Mehidy Hasan 4 – 2 – 7 – 1,Shakib Al Hasan 3 – 1 – 3 – 1.last_img read more

DOJ Brings First Corporate FCPA Enforcement Action Of 2015

first_imgNo doubt it was a coincidence, but it was hard to ignore the timing.Hours after the formal conclusion of the DOJ’s latest FCPA trial court debacle in U.S. v. Sigelman (see here, here and here for prior posts), the DOJ announced its first corporate FCPA enforcement action of 2015.The enforcement action was against IAP Worldwide Services, Inc. (a small Florida-based company that provides facilities management, contingency operations, and professional and technical services in contracting capacities to the U.S. military and other governmental agencies world-wide).According to its website, approximately 30% of IAP’s workers are veterans and the company was recently recognized by U.S. Veterans Magazine’s as one of the Top Veteran-Friendly Companies in 2014.  IAP has several contracts with the U.S. Government including the U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps and Air Force.Per the DOJ’s allegations, the improper conduct occurred 7-10 years ago and was engaged in by one individual at IAP who left the company approximately 7 years ago.The allegations focus on James Rama who was IAP’s Vice President of Special Project and Programs between 2005 and 2007. Prior to arriving at IAP, Rama, while employed in Kuwait by a large American defense contractor not affiliated with IAP, was introduced to a Kuwaiti Consultant and learned that the Kuwaiti Ministry of the Interior (MOI) was planning to build a large-scale homeland security systems called the KSP.When Rama joined IAP he began pursuing Phase I of the KSP contract on behalf of IAP as well as the more lucrative Phase II of the KSP project.  According to the DOJ, Rama and others formed Ramaco International Consulting LLC “to hide IAP’s involvement in the KSP bidding and contracting process.”According to the DOJ:“In or about November 2005, IAP (through Rama) received non-public indications that the MOI would select it for the Phase I contract, although the formal bidding process had not yet begun. In February 2006, at the direction of the MOI and Kuwaiti Consultant, Rama and others agreed to and did set up Ramaco as a shell company to “bid” on the Phase I contract. One purpose of setting up Ramaco was to allow IAP to hide its involvement in Phase I and participate in the later Phase II without any apparent conflict of interest. Ramaco began acting as the agent for IAP on the KSP.IAP agreed with the MOI that it would perform the KSP Phase I contract for approximately $4 million. Of that amount, IAP agreed that half, or approximately $2 million, would not be for actual work executing the KSP Phase I contract, but instead would be diverted to Kuwaiti Consultant.In or about 2006, IAP, Ramaco, Rama, and others structured an illicit payment scheme to funnel approximately 50% of the payments received on the Phase I contract to Kuwaiti Consultant so that he could pay bribes to Kuwaiti government officials and took numerous steps to hide these payments and prevent the detection of their scheme. IAP, Ramaco, and Rama understood that to pay Kuwaiti Consultant, Kuwaiti Company would first inflate its invoices to IAP by charging IAP for the total amount of both the legitimate services that Kuwaiti Company was providing and the payments that Kuwaiti Company was funneling to Kuwaiti Consultant without listing or otherwise disclosing the payments that were funneled to Kuwaiti Consultant. After the MOI paid Ramaco for work on the KSP Phase I contract, Ramaco would transfer funds to a bank account of IAP, and IAP would then transfer funds to Kuwaiti Company. IAP, Ramaco, and Rama knew that Kuwaiti Company was then paying Kuwaiti Consultant approximately 50% of the KSP Phase I contract amount. IAP, Ramaco, and Rama knew that these payments to Kuwaiti Consultant were often further disguised.In or about April 2006, Ramaco opened a bank account in Kuwait for Ramaco that would be used, in part, to pay Kuwaiti Consultant a portion of the money that IAP and Ramaco received from the KSP Phase I contract.On or about May 10, 2006, Rama signed the KSP Phase I contract between Ramaco and the Government of Kuwait, which included a markup of approximately $2 million that would be kicked back, in whole or in part, to Kuwaiti government officials through Kuwaiti Consultant.On or about September 19, 2006, IAP wired KD 120,000 (approximately $420,000) from its bank account to Kuwaiti Company’s bank account, and, on or about that same day, Kuwaiti Company paid that amount to Kuwaiti Consultant.In or about October 2006, employees of IAP and G3 met with Rama and others at IAP’s office in Arlington, Virginia, which is in the Eastern District of Virginia, in an effort to persuade IAP to continue making payments to Kuwaiti Consultant.On or about October 18, 2006, IAP wired KD 63,000 (approximately $220,500) from its bank account to Kuwaiti Company’s bank account, and, on or about that same day, Kuwaiti Company paid that amount to Kuwaiti Consultant.On or about June 5, 2007, IAP wired KD 29,962.27 (approximately $105,000) from its bank account in the United States to Kuwaiti Company’s bank account in Kuwait so that Kuwaiti Company could pay Kuwaiti Consultant, and, on or about June 13, 2007, IAP wired that amount from its bank account in the United States to Kuwaiti Company’s bank account.On or about December 6, 2007, Ramaco paid Kuwaiti Consultant KD 52,250 (approximately $183,000). 22. On or about March 10, 2008, Ramaco paid Kuwaiti Consultant KD 44,250 (approximately $155,000).Between September 2006 and March 2008, IAP and its co-conspirators paid Kuwaiti Consultant at least KD 509,625 (approximately $1,783,688) on the understanding that some or all of that money would be provided as bribes to Kuwaiti government officials to assist IAP in obtaining and retaining the KSP Phase I contract and to obtain the KSP Phase II contract.”The above allegations were resolved via a non-prosecution agreement in which IAP agreed to pay”a monetary penalty in the present value amount of $7.1 million”.  Pursuant to the NPA, the penalty is to be paid in four yearly installments of $1.775 million. The NPA, which has a three year term, states as follows:“Among the facts considered were the following: (a) the Company has cooperated with the Offices, including conducting an extensive internal investigation, voluntarily making U.S. and foreign employees available for interviews, and collecting, analyzing, and organizing voluminous evidence and information for the Offices; (b) the Company has engaged in remediation, including disciplining the officers and employees responsible for the corrupt payments or terminating their employment, enhancing its due diligence protocol for third-party agents and consultants, and instituting heightened review of proposals and other transactional documents for relevant Company contracts; (c) the Company has committed to continue to enhance its compliance program and internal controls, including ensuring that its compliance program satisfies the minimum elements set forth in Attachment C to this Agreement; and (d) the Company has agreed to continue to cooperate with the Offices in any ongoing investigation of the conduct of the Company and its officers, directors, employees, agents, and consultants relating to possible violations under investigation by the Offices.”As noted in the DOJ’s release:“[The] non-prosecution agreement requires IAP to conduct a review of its existing internal controls, policies and procedures, and make any necessary modifications to ensure that the company maintains accurate record keeping and a rigorous anti-corruption compliance program.  The non-prosecution agreement further requires IAP to report periodically to the Criminal Division and to the U.S. Attorney’s Office of the Eastern District of Virginia regarding remediation and implementation of the aforementioned compliance program and internal controls, policies and procedures.”Typical of most corporate FCPA enforcement actions, the NPA contains a “muzzle clause” in which IAP agreed that it shall not directly or indirectly make any public statement contradicting the information set forth in the NPA.Based on the same core conduct alleged in the NPA, the DOJ announced a plea agreement with James Rama to one count of conspiracy to violate the FCPA.  See here for the plea agreement, here for the Statement of Facts, and here for the criminal information.For additional coverage of the enforcement action see here from Reuters.last_img read more