Five Former Members of the Allman Brothers Announce More Fall Dates As ‘Les Brers’

first_imgLes Brers snuck into 2016 like it was no body’s business. But after a couple of mind-blowing sets at Wanee Music Festival and The Peach Music Festival, the secret is fully out. Led by original drummers Butch Trucks and Jaimoe, along with former members Oteil Burbridge, Marc Quiñones, and Jack Pearson, the supergroup also includes Lamar Williams Jr., Pat Bergeson, and Bruce Katz.This all-star lineup recently announced a handful of September dates, and have since added five more shows to the middle of October. From the Brooklyn Bowl in NYC, to New Jersey’s Wellmont Theatre, Philadelphia’s The Fillmore, Lancaster’s Chameleon Club, and Wesbury’s NYCB Theatre, those fellow fans looking for a way to cherish the Allman Brothers Band on the East Coast are certainly lined up for a surprise visit. For ticketing links and more information, visit the band’s website.Les Brers Fall Tour:07 SEP THE RIDGEFIELD PLAYHOUSE RIDGEFIELD, CT08 SEP CASINO BALLROOM HAMPTON BEACH, NH09 SEP HOUSE OF BLUES, BOSTON, MA10 SEP PARAMOUNT THEATRE, RUTLAND, VT12 OCT BROOKLYN BOWL, BROOKLYN, NY13 OCT WELLMONT THEATRE, MONTCLAIR, NJ14 OCT FILLMORE PHILADELPHIA15 OCT CHAMELEON CLUB, LANCASTER, PA16 OCT NYCB THEATRE AT WESTBURY, WESTBURY, NYlast_img read more

Using tendon transfer surgery to restore key functions in spinal cord injury

first_img Source:https://www.loyolamedicine.org Jul 20 2018After suffering a severe cervical spinal cord injury from a bad fall at work, Scott McConnell had little function remaining in his hands and arms.Loyola Medicine orthopaedic surgeon Michael Bednar, MD, was able to restore key functions with a series of operations called tendon transfers.Mr. McConnell now can open his fingers up much more than he could before, and he can close them in a tight grip. He can pinch with his thumb and extend his arms outward. He is able to more easily perform everyday tasks such as grasping a cup, brushing his teeth and using his cell phone.”I have a lot more ability in both my hands and my arms,” Mr. McConnell said.Related StoriesPorvair Sciences develops new fluid collection vent for surgical suction cannistersTen-fold rise in tongue-tie surgery for newborns ‘without any real strong data’An injection of nanoparticles for spinal cord injuriesDepending on the extent of the spinal cord injury, tendon transfers can enable a patient to grasp objects, open the hand, pinch the thumb and straighten the elbow.In a tendon transfer, muscles that still work are redirected to do the jobs of muscles that are paralyzed. For example, the surgeon may detach one of the working muscles that flexes the elbow and reattach it to a nonworking muscle that flexes the thumb.The number of functioning muscles a patient has will determine what tendon transfers the surgeon will perform. The more working muscles available for transfer, the more functions can be restored. Tendon transfers typically involve two surgeries on each arm, performed three months apart. Arms are done one at a time. During rehabilitation, patients learn how to use the transferred muscles.Dr. Bednar has performed tendon transfers on about 75 patients and is among the most skilled and experienced surgeons in the country doing the procedure.”Performing tendon transfers on patients with cervical spinal cord injuries requires a team approach,” Dr. Bednar said. “The team works with the surgeon to determine who is an appropriate candidate for surgery. The team then helps the patient through the surgeries and rehabilitation, thereby ensuring maximum benefit from the procedures.”Patients who potentially can benefit the most from tendon transfers have spinal cord injuries in the C5-C8 cervical nerves in the lower neck. Mr. McConnell’s injury was C5-C6.”These are the most satisfying patients with whom I get to work,” Dr. Bednar said. “To do the operation and have them activate a muscle for the first time since their injury, and see the look in their eyes and their face light up when they realize the function is back, is one of the most rewarding things I get to do as a surgeon.”last_img read more