University bolsters local economy

first_imgNotre Dame’s recently released 2013 Economic Impact Report indicates that the partnership between the University and local communities is evolving and thriving. In a statement, South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg said maintaining this relationship is crucial for both parties. “The relationship between our city and Notre Dame is at an all-time high, and these numbers help tell the story,” Buttigieg said. “The local economy benefits hugely from the role of the university. “That said, I look forward to partnering to find even more and bigger ways to grow our economy around the constant activity and important research that takes place at Notre Dame.” The Economic Impact Report, released Sept. 25 and based on data from 2012, puts the University’s total economic impact per year in St. Joseph County at $1.167 billion. Student, visitor and University spending contributed to that amount, associate vice president for public affairs Tim Sexton said. “When you put out a number of over $1.1 billion of economic impact, I mean that’s huge,” he said. “But it’s also huge because in order for us to have this kind of an impact, we need … the support of the community. “This is a two-way street. We can’t do a lot of what we do here at the University without the local community.” Jessica Brookshire, associate director for public affairs, led a University team that worked with New York-based consulting group Appleseed to collect and analyze data from more than 80 individuals on campus, as well as sources off campus such as Visit South Bend Mishawaka. The University publishes a report every five years through a process that takes more than seven months, Brookshire said. “One thing that was really cool was to go back and look at the one from five years ago and see what was in it,” Brookshire said. “Back then Eddy Street Commons was an idea, basically. An artist rendering was the picture. It was not in existence, neither was Compton Family Ice Arena.” Sexton said the University added 700 jobs, and construction costs averaged $95 million per year for the last five years. Money spent for research increased by 92 percent since the previous report, he said. “Being the fact that the University has its five goals and one of those goals is a preeminent research institution, it will not surprise me to see the research dollar continue to climb and continue to grow going forward in the next five years,” Sexton said. “I think that that construction component again will be extremely significant.” Appleseed president Hugh O’Neill, who worked on the Economic Impact Report this year and in 2007, said the findings about research set Notre Dame apart from other universities that have teamed up with the company. “We’ve worked with a number of different universities that have larger research programs and higher total research spending than Notre Dame does but there aren’t many that have been as successful as Notre Dame has in expanding its research activities in the past 10 years,” he said. Sexton said the report incorporated data from the Center for Social Concerns and Engage ND to measure volunteer work and offered another insight into the town and gown dynamic. “When it comes to the amount of service hours, we put that at 511,000 hours that was contributed by our students, by our faculty, by our staff,” he said. “I will not be surprised to see those service hours continue to grow, because that’s just who we are as a university. I have no doubt that that will occur.” Brookshire said the report includes football weekend statistics that reflect the high amount of visitors to South Bend and Mishawaka and the economic boon those visitors offer. “It’s about $18 million per home game, and that’s very significant to businesses locally and people that are thinking about opening business here in town,” she said. The economic impact of visitors to campus in general was markedly different from that of most other universities, O’Neill said. “Notre Dame is not alone but is at the high end of the range in terms of the extent to which the University is bringing money and resources into the South Bend area from all over the country and the extent to which that money has been spent locally,” he said. “That really enhances and strengthens the University’s contribution to the local economy.” Visit South Bend Mishawaka communications and public relations coordinator Lindsey Talboom said the increased economic activity of the University and its visitors as well as collaborations between the University, South Bend and Mishawaka have created an environment full-time residents and visitors alike can enjoy. “I can only see it growing really,” she said. “There’s clearly an investment that’s bridging the divide.” Sexton emphasized the importance of maintaining that connection from the University perspective. “The University of Notre Dame and our relationship with our local community is paramount and I think that this report does a great job of showing how we are intertwined for the positive,” he said. “The success of the University is directly correlated to the success of the local community.”last_img read more

10 months agoFulham plan bid for Bournemouth striker Lys Mousset

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Fulham plan bid for Bournemouth striker Lys Moussetby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveFulham are eyeing Bournemouth striker Lys Mousset.Fulham are planning a January move for Mousset, says West London Sport.The French striker has struggled to make an impact with the Cherries but could now be handed a lifeline by their Premier League rivals.Fulham are looking to strengthen as they prepare for a relegation scrap after a tough start to the season.The French frontman has made just seven top-flight starts since joining the Dorset club from Le Havre for around €6.5m some two and a half years ago.He has scored four goals, two of which were in the league. last_img read more

22 days agoMan Utd U21 coach Wood hails Chong attitude for Lincoln win

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Man Utd U21 coach Wood hails Chong attitude for Lincoln winby Paul Vegas22 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United U21 coach Neil Wood has praised the attitude of Tahith Chong.The winger turned out for the EFL Trophy win over Lincoln City.Wood explained what the 19-year-old brings to his team.”I think it was good for him to be out there. He needed some game time and he did really well for the goal, got in between the lines and drove at the guy and went and had a good hand in the first goal,” Wood said.”He’s got great experience and he talks to the lads a lot on the pitch so we’re happy to have him with us.” last_img read more

Ohio State, Nike Officially Release Black Uniforms Team Will Wear Against Penn State

first_imgOhio State black uniforms.Where does the black uniform rank?Ohio State will be wearing black uniforms against Penn State on October 17. We already knew that. But today, Nike and the school made it official. Ohio State released the full black uniform Saturday morning around 8:30 AM ET.The look features black jerseys, black pants and a black matte helmet. Nike also released what it calls the “Black Pack”, which features shirts, hats, shoes and other apparel related to the black uniforms. Check it all out:Ohio State unveils first-ever black Buckeyes uniforms. Buckeyes will wear alternate uniform vs. Penn State on 10/17. pic.twitter.com/haUyJnrvYf— ESPN CollegeFootball (@ESPNCFB) October 3, 2015Lights out power. The all-new Nike @OhioStAthletics Black Pack. http://t.co/mX1C8L5gsm pic.twitter.com/V4dCoIXgEQ— Nike Football (@usnikefootball) October 3, 2015Ohio State fans – what do you think of the new look?last_img read more

British man seeks China state TV ban for forced confession

first_imgLONDON — A British corporate investigator has filed a complaint to U.K. regulators about Chinese state TV, saying its British license should be revoked because it broadcast his forced confession when he was imprisoned in China.Peter Humphrey filed a complaint Friday against China Central Television and its international division, China Global Television, for violating British broadcasting rules.Humphrey and his wife spent two years in prison after being convicted of illegally acquiring personal information of Chinese citizens.The couple had been hired on contract by pharmaceuticals company GlaxoSmithKline to look into a security breach, but became collateral damage when the Chinese government began investigating the pharmaceutical company’s bribery practices.The pair was shown on Chinese television purportedly confessing their crimes.CGTN is available on free and pay television channels in Britain. The broadcaster is reportedly expanding its presence in Europe with a new studio and production centre set to open in London by the end of the year.In 2012, Britain’s communications regulator, Ofcom, revoked Iranian state-owned Press TV’s license following a complaint by Newsweek journalist Maziar Bahari that the station aired an interview with him while he was detained. Bahari said he was forced to do a scripted interview with his captors, who threatened him with execution.The Associated Presslast_img read more

How major US stock indexes fared Wednesday

first_imgStocks surged on Wall Street Wednesday, with the Dow Jones Industrial Average vaulting more than 1,000 points, its biggest one-day point-gain ever.Investors recouped all their losses from a Christmas Eve plunge as stocks rallied across all sectors, giving the Dow and benchmark S&P 500 index its best single-day percentage gain in 10 years.On Wednesday:The S&P 500 index rose 116.60 points, or 5 per cent, to 2,467.70.The Dow soared 1,086.25 points, or 5 per cent, to 22,878.45.The Nasdaq composite gained 361.44 points, or 5.8 per cent, to 6,554.36.The Russell 2000 index of smaller-company stocks picked up 62.89 points, or 5 per cent, 1,329.81.For the week:The S&P 500 is up 51.08 points, or 2.1 per cent.The Dow is up 433.08 points, or 1.9 per cent.The Nasdaq is up 221.36 points, or 3.5 per cent.The Russell 2000 is up 37.72 points, or 2.9 per cent.For the year:The S&P 500 is down 205.91 points, or 7.7 per cent.The Dow is down 1,840.77 points, or 7.5 per cent.The Nasdaq is down 349.04 points, or 5.1 per cent.The Russell 2000 is down 205.70 points, or 13.4 per cent.The Associated Presslast_img read more

Trade minister Carr betting on LNG to unlock trade in China and

first_img“I would say there are lots of possibilities for sectoral trade. We know the LNG possibility is real. We know that the Chinese Canadian community is very interested in deepening ties.”The distinction Carr makes is significant. An attempt to launch formal free trade talks last winter stalled because Chinese leaders flatly rejected the Trudeau government’s progressive trade agenda that would have included labour, gender and Indigenous rights.And then there’s that surprise clause in the new USMCA. It requires a member country to provide notice and information to the other two partners if it plans free trade talks with a “non-market” economy. It gives the other partners a say in the text of such a deal.The Chinese embassy in Ottawa blasted the inclusion of the new clause because it unfairly targets China’s potential trading partners, and unfairly brands it as a “ non-market” economy. Carr is so buoyant about the door-opening possibilities of shipping cleaner energy across the Pacific that he categorically discounts the effect of another surprise on the trade file this past week.He sees no obstacle in the controversial clause in the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement that allows any of the countries to withdraw from the deal on six-months notice if one of the partners enters into a free trade agreement with a non-market economy, China, again.“There’s nothing in the trade agreement with Mexico and the United States that stops Canada from that. The deal has no impact on Canadian sovereignty or the capacity of the Canadian government to do business around the world,” Carr said.Carr’s job is to find new trading markets for Canada beyond its largest trading partner, the United States. The word “diversification” was conspicuously added to his job title during a July cabinet shuffle and the minister is clearly thrilled with what he sees as the LNG arrow in his quiver.Given the rocky, insult-laden, 14-month road to a new North American trade deal, the need to fulfil the promise of diversification has never been greater for Canada. Carr is also eyeing India, South America, and other Asian countries, as well as pushing for the speedy ratification of the new Trans-Pacific Partnership.He is hoping to travel to China next month, though he stops short of calling for all-out free trade with the country that is the subject of so much Trump administration ire. OTTAWA, O.N. – Jim Carr’s view of enhancing Canadian trade in Asia _ and its biggest prize, China _ is rosier these days because he’s seeing the possibilities through a new lens: LNG Canada’s new $40-billion liquefied natural gas project in northern B.C.“The most interesting development in Canada’s relationship with China happened (Tuesday),” the new minister of international trade diversification said in an interview one day after the historic announcement to build the long-awaited LNG plant in Kitimat, B.C.“What we’ll be able to say to our potential customers is that this now is real and there will be timetables.”center_img Trade experts and analysts support the careful approach that Carr advocates because it gives Canada room to talk to China without overtly angering the United States.“The Americans may still take notice but there’s nothing to stop Canada from continuing to have productive conversations with the Chinese in areas that we have common interests,” said Meredith Lilly, a trade expert at Carleton University.Lilly said the non-market economy clause is unusual and represents a new way for the Trump administration to force its allies to “pick sides” in its ongoing trade dispute with China that has seen billions of dollars of tariffs imposed on Chinese goods, and retaliation by Beijing.“You can view those as targeted at China, and the U.S. creating a template for future trade agreements with other countries beyond Mexico and Canada,” said Lilly.Derek Burney, who was a key player in the Brian Mulroney government that negotiated the original Canada-U.S. free trade deal, said he’s not convinced the clause has any teeth to prevent Canada from moving forward economically with China, which he urged the government to do “as assertively” as possible.“We have misfired in our approaches to China thus far. We have to redouble those efforts and get more serious, and not just with China, but with India as well,” he said.“China’s going to be the No. 1 economy in a number of years, not decades. We’ve got to take it more seriously.”Burney said business needs to do more to find opportunities to capitalize on the major trade deals that Canada has already completed with the European Union and South Korea, among others, as well as the new TPP that the Trudeau government hopes to ratify this fall.“I don’t see as much evidence yet of our companies taking advantage of the openings that those agreements are giving us,” said Burney. “The biggest handicap in Canada is complacency. We’ve become comfortable in the cocoon of dealing with the Americans for 75 percent of our trade.”Carr is anything but complacent.A full legislative effort is being made to ensure the rebooted TPP will be ratified this fall, giving Canada so-called first-mover advantage by being among the first six counties in the 11-country Pacific Rim pact to benefit. Meanwhile, Canada’s battalion of 1,000 trade commissioners and a newly created Invest in Canada agency are pushing hard on all fronts, said Carr.“All of it plays to the heart of our strategic investment, which is to safeguard the most important trading relationship for Canada, which we have done while expanding possibilities, which we are doing.”(THE CANADIAN PRESS)last_img read more

Has the US Mens National Team Plateaued

This view suggests the U.S. may have reached a new plateau. The performance of the 2002 team, for instance, is problematic from this vantage point. If the U.S. fails to beat Belgium on Tuesday, that means it will have gone three World Cups without equaling (much less improving upon) the 2002 team’s performance. Perhaps we’re left with the global soccer equivalent of the Atlanta Hawks: a team that will usually make the “playoffs” then lose in the first round.This might seem like a contrived reading of the evidence. But mapping the Americans’ trajectory from 1986 onward is also selective: It’s easy to make an upward pattern look more impressive by starting from what you know to be a low point.There’s a credible story behind each theory. Under the steady-improvement theory, the story is one of demographic and cultural trends abetted by some measure of self-perpetuating success (a positive feedback loop). Soccer has been a big youth-participation sport since the 1970s, but immigration from Latin America may be giving the U.S. even more young athletes who are interested in soccer. The occasional successes of the U.S. men’s national team, along with an increasingly popular domestic league (and improved television visibility for the English Premier League and Liga MX) may motivate some of these young athletes to play soccer professionally instead of transitioning into baseball, football or another sport.The punctuated-equilibrium theory suggests that the U.S. was badly underachieving its soccer potential for many years. Then it got its act together when it was chosen to host a World Cup: better facilities, more investment in the national team, a sustainable domestic league and so forth. But it was picking low-hanging fruit. It shouldn’t be that difficult for a super-wealthy country like the United States, which excels at so many other sports, to be half-decent at soccer if it tries.What’s more challenging is going from a country that sometimes makes the knockout phase to one that sometimes makes the World Cup semifinals — or beyond. It’s not clear that the U.S.’s wealth, or its athletic prowess, implies that it ought to be much more successful at soccer than it has been in recent years. For instance, we can compare each country’s GDP (taken as a natural logarithm) against its soccer team’s Elo rating as of June. There’s certainly some relationship, but it’s rough (soccer is a comparatively inexpensive sport). The trendline in the chart implies that a best guess for the United States is an Elo rating somewhere in mid-1,800s, almost exactly where it is today.The same story holds if we compare the number of medals each country has won at the Summer Olympics since 2000 (again taken as a natural logarithm5Because a number of countries have won no medals since 2000 — meaning that their natural logarithm would be undefined — I instead take the log of the number of medals won plus one.) against its soccer team’s Elo rating.There’s a high margin of error on these estimates. China’s GDP (and its Olympic medal count) is just a little less than the United States’ — but its soccer team has qualified for only one World Cup and has gotten worse in recent years. Germany also has a big economy and a big medal count — and its soccer team is great. The point is that the U.S. men’s national team is no longer underachieving reasonable expectations, as it was before the 1990s. Nor is it exceeding them. Perhaps what we’ve seen is about what we’re due to get in a populous, wealthy, athletic country — where interest in soccer is average, at best, by global standards.The success of the U.S. women’s national soccer team stands in contrast to that of the men’s. But soccer players are among the highest-profile female athletes in the U.S., suggesting that part of the problem for the men’s side is competition from other sports.The punctuated-equilibrium theory would imply that it may take some time for the U.S. men’s team to reach the next plateau. Perhaps an external catalyst would help: another American World Cup, a run to the World Cup semifinals, the emergence of an American soccer player who is recognized as among the best in the world. (Personally, I’d hope for him to be as brash as Cristiano Ronaldo, the better to spark headlines and stoke rivalries with other countries.) But it could be a long while before any of those things happen, and there could be some further delay before their feedback effects kick in.Or it could be that the steady-improvement theory is right. It also reflects a reasonable interpretation of the evidence. The data on youth interest in soccer is very encouraging, for instance.Tuesday’s game against Belgium will provide us with one data point — but just one. Unlike in the past, however, we might not need to wait four years for the next one. Instead, in 2016, the United States will host the Copa América Centenario, a special one-off tournament that will feature the best teams from both North and South America. It could serve as a preview of our soccer future. Playing at home produces the equivalent of an 100 Elo-point bonus — equal to eight years of improvement for the U.S. based on its 1986 to 2014 trajectory. If the U.S. will be ready to compete with the Colombias and Argentinas and Brazils of the world on neutral turf by 2022 and 2026, it should be able to do so on home soil in 2016.CORRECTION (July 1, 4:54 p.m.): A chart in an earlier version of this post mislabeled the Elo ratings vs. Olympic medal counts for China and Russia. The chart has been updated. For the United States, almost every recent World Cup match has been billed as the most important game in the history of the men’s national team. Its knockout-stage match against Belgium on Tuesday isn’t receiving quite as much hype.1The New Republic does describe the U.S.-Belgium game as the “most important sporting event in American history.” That’s apparently a joke, however. But a win would advance the U.S. to the World Cup quarterfinals for a Saturday afternoon match against Argentina or Switzerland. That would probably be the most-watched game in U.S. soccer history — the first World Cup quarterfinal that many American fans would ever see their men play live.2The U.S. advanced to the quarterfinals in 2002, but its game against Germany was played in South Korea at 7:30 a.m. Eastern time on a Saturday morning — not ideal viewing hours. The U.S. also advanced from its group to the semifinals in the inaugural World Cup in 1930, but that was when just four teams made the knockout stage.It’s tempting to say that these matches are the soccer equivalent of political “game changers” — much-ballyhooed events that seem exciting at the time but which rarely have as much lasting impact as the pundits claim. But it’s not unreasonable to feel as though every World Cup game is more important than the last. It’s a consequence of the long-term state of U.S. soccer.On the one hand, expectations are getting higher. The U.S. advanced from the group stage in 1994, 2002, 2010 and now 2014. Matches against England or Portugal or Germany are now thought of as opportunities rather than sure losses. On the other hand, the men’s national team has never quite had its breakthrough moment.When might the bar be raised? When might U.S. fans view a Round of 16 exit as a travesty and not a triumph?If you’re in your mid-30s, like me, the advance of the U.S. men’s national team might seem as inevitable as that of gay marriage. You’ll be just old enough to remember that the U.S. was once a soccer backwater. But you might not remember how long it took the Americans to get where they are today. The trajectory since the 1980s has always been upward:This chart shows the Elo rating for the U.S. in each World Cup year3Specifically, it shows the U.S.’s Elo rating as of the date of the World Cup final — whether or not the U.S. actually qualified for the tournament. For 2014, I’ve used the U.S.’s Elo rating at the end of the group stage. since 1986 — the last World Cup where the Americans failed to qualify, and the last one before 1988, when FIFA declared the 1994 World Cup would be played in the U.S.From this perspective, the upward trend has been extremely steady. In fact, other than the 2002 team arriving in the quarterfinals a little ahead of schedule, it’s been almost perfectly linear. Since 1986, the U.S.’s Elo rating has improved by almost exactly 50 points every four years.Imagine that the trend continues. Right now, the U.S. team’s Elo rating is nearly 1,850, which places it 15th in the world. Add another 50 points, and by 2018 it would be at 1,900 — somewhere around eighth or 10th in the world and near where Belgium and Uruguay and France are today. That’s a team that could be a dark-horse World Cup contender. By 2026, its Elo rating would be 2,000 — not far from where Argentina, Germany and the Netherlands began this year’s tournament. So in just 12 more years — in a World Cup that could possibly be held in the United States — the U.S. will be a global soccer powerhouse.Or perhaps not. Consider another look at the evidence, one where we run the numbers back further. For much of the 1970s, there was a lot of hope surrounding the growth of U.S. soccer, but the men’s national team repeatedly failed to qualify for the World Cup. In one year, the U.S. failed to win a single qualifying match. But let’s go back ever further, to 1950. This tells a different story. The men’s national team got worse from 1950 to 1958, bottomed out for almost 30 years with no sign of life, improved rather sharply in a concentrated period from 1986 through 2002, and has been fairly steady since.Yes, the U.S. has still gotten better by this reckoning — but it looks more like a case of punctuated equilibrium — a sudden change after years of stasis.4The so-called punctuated trend in the chart is drawn by fitting a regression with a dummy variable that is taken as zero between 1950 and 1986 and one between 2002 and 2014 and allowed to vary at a linear rate only in the intervening years. read more

Berzins brothers to battle in Chicago volleyball match

When the Buckeyes step into Gentile Arena in Chicago on Saturday and senior outside hitter Mik Berzins looks at the opposing team’s bench, he will see two people he knows quite well. “I’ve grown accustomed to playing my brothers over at Loyola,” he said. “It’s a good rivalry.” Berzins’ brothers, Kris and Dainis, have made the family name synonymous with volleyball at Loyola University Chicago, just as their father paved the way for Mik at Ohio State. The tradition begins with OSU Hall of Famer, Aldis Berzins. The Olympic gold medalist and former outside hitter led the Buckeyes to four Midwestern Intercollegiate Volleyball Association championships and four NCAA Final Four appearances between 1975 and 1978. Like father, like sons. Kris, Mik and Dainis have played at the outside hitter position and have made strides within their respective programs. Even the youngest Berzins, sophomore Dainis, started in 21 sets last year and tallied 113 kills, according to Loyola’s athletic website. “We all really support each other and want to have the other one do well,” Mik said. “I’m not going to cheer whenever Dainis gets a kill, but I wish him the best.” Former all-American Kris Berzins amassed more than 1,000 kills and 500 digs in his career with the Ramblers, one of only seven players in school history to do so. After a year on the professional circuit in Austria, Kris returned to Chicago as an assistant coach for the 2012 season. Ramblers’ coach Shane Davis said he tried to recruit Mik, too. “I thought we had him,” Davis said. “He took another look at Ohio State unfortunately, but we definitely wanted him.” Mik said he chose OSU over Loyola because he could see himself succeeding in the versatile program. “I came in as a libero, and I got the opportunity this year, and a little bit last year, to play some outside hitter,” he said. “Ohio State was the best place for me to go.” Mik has helped propel the Buckeyes to an 11-4 record with 120 kills, 10 service aces and a 0.928 serve percentage so far this season. He also has the most career digs in school history with 787. OSU’s coach Pete Hanson describes Mik as a passer, defender and server, but not one to be distracted by the family feud that awaits him this weekend. “Mik does a great job for us,” Hanson said. “He’ll be in a good frame of mind in terms of Ohio State volleyball.” The Buckeyes are 28-13 on the series against conference rival Loyola, and are on a five-match winning streak. The No. 14-ranked Ramblers have fared better at home, however, with a 9-7 record against OSU there. Davis, who shared the MIVA Coach of the Year award with Hanson in 2010, said that he is most looking forward to “all the hype” surrounding the match. “The two teams, we have a lot of history together,” he said. The trio from Brinklow, Md., will reunite Saturday after OSU makes a stop in Romeoville, Ill., to face No. 7-ranked Lewis on Thursday. Both matches are set to begin at 7 p.m. read more

Ohio State mens basketball to take on Louisville in 2014 Big TenACC

Senior guard Aaron Craft (4) caries the ball down the court in a game against Dayton. OSU lost, 60-59, at First Niagara Center March 20.Credit: Ritika Shah / Asst. photo editorThe Ohio State men’s basketball team has bolstered its strength of schedule for the upcoming season with the addition of a former national champion.OSU spokesman Dan Wallenberg confirmed Thursday the Buckeyes are scheduled to take on the Louisville Cardinals Dec. 2 at the KFC Yum! Center in Louisville, Ky.The matchup is one of 14 games set to be played as a part of the 16th annual Big Ten/ACC Challenge. The previous two challenges were split by the two conferences.The Cardinals, which won the 2013 NCAA national championship, finished the 2013-14 season 31-6 and 15-3, including a win over the eventual national champion Connecticut in the inaugural American Athletic Conference championship game. Louisville fell to rival Kentucky in the Sweet 16, 74-69.The Buckeyes’ season ended when OSU lost to the Dayton Flyers in the second round of the NCAA tournament, 60-59.OSU is set to enter the 2014-15 season without three of its starters from last season as junior forward LaQuinton Ross declared for the NBA Draft and senior guards Aaron Craft and Lenzelle Smith Jr. are set to graduate. Sophomore guard Amedeo Della Valle also left the program to pursue a professional career in Italy.The Buckeyes are set to welcome a top five recruiting class to Columbus, according to ESPN, as well as bringing in transfer forwards Anthony Lee, a former redshirt-junior from Temple, and Trevor Thompson, a former freshman from Virginia Tech. Lee will be eligible to play immediately for coach Thad Matta, while Thompson is expected to sit out the 2014-15 season per NCAA transfer regulations. read more