Teams named for Scotland v New Zealand

first_imgScotland v New Zealand EMC Autumn TestVenue: MurrayfieldDate: Saturday 13 November Kick-off: 1715 GMTCoverage: BBC One Scotland, BBC Radio Scotland commentary available via BBC Sport websiteScotland head coach Andy Robinson has challenged his side to build on their four match unbeaten run and earn the respect of the world’s best side when they face New Zealand in the first EMC Autumn Test at Murrayfield on Saturday. Robinson has made five changes from the Scotland team that started their last international – the historic 13-9 series-clinching success against Argentina in Mar del Plata in June. Rory Lamont replaces the recently injured Simon Danielli on the wing, while the rejuvenated Mike Blair, Scotland’s most-capped scrum-half, will start instead of Rory Lawson and will captain his country for the 14th time. In the pack Euan Murray is preferred to Moray Low at tight-head while the Glasgow pair, Richie Gray, 21, and Richie Vernon, 23, will both make their first starts for Scotland in place of their team-mates, Alastair Kellock and Johnnie Beattie both of whom are recovering from injuries.Robinson said: “It is imperative that we front up from the first whistle against the All Blacks on Saturday and play the game at a tempo where we can unveil our skills and show our discipline, because the winning of this Test match is in our hands.“We have shown our appetite to drive forward our game and our aim is to improve on our best performances last season, which we know inspired the country.“As someone who loves his rugby it’s been a real thrill to watch many of New Zealand’s games this year and, for me, it’s important that this month the Scotland team earn the respect of the southern hemisphere by the qualities we bring to bear.”More than 51,500 tickets have been sold for Saturday’s Test and Robinson is keen to see more surge through the Murrayfield turnstiles as tickets remain on sale until Friday night.“The support we had during our Autumn Test against Australia last year was phenomenal – the crowd shared the players’ belief and conviction that day and roared us on and we have to do our bit to create that same fabulous atmosphere this weekend,” he said.Tickets can be bought in three ways: via the Scottish Rugby website (www.scottishrugby.org); via the 24 hour phone line 0844 335 3933; or in person from the Scottish Rugby Ticket Centre, Gate A, Roseburn Street, Edinburgh. Please note there are no ticket sales on match day.  Website and phone line sales close at 12 midnight on Friday, while the Ticket Centre is open for personal purchasers from 9am-8pm, Monday to Friday this week. Tickets are priced at £20, £25 and £45 for adults and £10, £12.50 and £22.50 for under-18s.Scotland team (sponsor Murray) to play New Zealand in the EMC Autumn Test on Saturday 13 November at Murrayfield (kick-off 5.15pm):15 Hugo Southwell (Stade Francais), 54 caps, 8 tries, 40 points14 Rory Lamont (Toulon) 23 caps, 6 tries, 30 points13 Max Evans (Glasgow Warriors) 13 caps, 2 tries, 10 points12 Graeme Morrison (Glasgow Warriors) 25 caps, 3 tries, 15 points11 Sean Lamont (Scarlets) 47 caps, 7 tries, 35 points10 Dan Parks (Cardiff Blues) 53 caps, 4 tries,  10 conversions, 33 penalties, 11 drop-goals,  172 points9 Mike Blair (Edinburgh) CAPTAIN 64 caps, 5 tries, 25 points1 Allan Jacobsen (Edinburgh) 47 caps2 Ross Ford (Edinburgh) 40 caps, 2 tries, 10 points3 Euan Murray (Northampton Saints) 32 caps, 2 tries, 10 points4 Richie Gray (Glasgow Warriors) 3 caps5 Jim Hamilton (Gloucester) 29 caps, 1 try, 5 points6 Kelly Brown (Saracens) 37 caps, 3 tries, 15 points8 Richie Vernon (Glasgow Warriors) 3 caps7 John Barclay (Glasgow Warriors) 20 caps, 2 tries, 10 pointsSubstitutes16 Scott Lawson (Gloucester) 22 caps, 2 tries, 10 points17 Alasdair Dickinson (Gloucester) 18 caps18 Nathan Hines (Leinster) 64 caps, 2 tries, 10 points19 Ross Rennie (Edinburgh) 1 cap20 Ross Laidlaw (Edinburgh)21 Ruaridh Jackson (Glasgow Warriors) uncapped22 Nikki Walker (Ospreys) 15 caps, 4 tries, 20 pointsReferee: Dave Pearson (England).  Assistant referees: Wayne Barnes and Robin Goodliffe (both England).  TMO: Giulio de Santis (Italy). 21. Stephen Donald (20)22. Ma’a Nonu (54) All Blacks team named for Test against Scotland LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS McCaw and Muliaina to equal Fitzpatrick’s All Blacks Test record Former All Blacks captain Sean Fitzpatrick has paid tribute to current All Blacks captain Richie McCaw and All Blacks fullback Mils Muliaina who will this weekend equal his All Blacks record of 92 Test caps.The pair were today named in the All Blacks team to play Scotland at Murrayfield this Saturday, with McCaw in his familiar number seven jersey and Muliaina at fullback.29-year-old McCaw and 30-year-old Muliaina first met on the rugby field when McCaw’s Otago Boys’ High School played Muliaina’s Southland Boys’ High School in 1997. They then played together in various New Zealand age-grade teams before embarking on their stellar All Blacks careers.McCaw made his All Blacks Test debut on 17 November 2001 against Ireland as a fresh-faced 20 year old and captained the All Blacks for the first time against Wales on the 2004 end of year tour, aged just 23. He is already the most capped All Blacks Test captain in history and will extend that record when he leads the side for the 55th time this weekend.Muliaina joined the national squad in 2003 making his Test debut as a 22 year old against England in Wellington on 14 June and has also captained the side in three Tests. He has scored 145 points in Tests and, remarkably, will play his first Test against Scotland this weekend.Sean Fitzpatrick, who played for the All Blacks from 1986 to 1997, said it was a remarkable achievement for McCaw and Muliaina to join him as the most capped All Blacks, with both players also set to extend the record.All Blacks Coach Graham Henry and his Assistant Coaches Steve Hansen and Wayne Smith have named their team for the Test against Scotland at Murrayfield on Saturday 13 November, the third Test in the All Blacks Telecom BackingBlack Tour.The match will see a significant milestone for two All Blacks – captain Richie McCaw and fullback Mils Muliaina will equal former All Blacks captain Sean Fitzpatrick’s record of 92 Test caps. (See separate media release).The team to play Scotland is as follows:Starting XV: 1. Tony Woodcock (71)2. Keven Mealamu (82) / Hikawera Elliot (uncapped)3. Owen Franks (19)4. Brad Thorn (48)5. Samuel Whitelock (10)6. Liam Messam (5)7. Richie McCaw – captain (91)8. Kieran Read (27)9. Jimmy Cowan (42)10. Daniel Carter (76)11. Hosea Gear (3)12. Sonny Bill Williams (1)13. Conrad Smith (42)14. Isaia Toeava (28)15. Mils Muliaina (91)Reserves: 16. Andrew Hore (47)17. John Afoa (27)18. Anthony Boric (17)19. Daniel Braid (4)20. Andy Ellis (15)last_img read more

Choosing the right personal trainer course

first_imgA picture taken on January 12, 2012, shows the weight room at the Kirsha Training Facilities complex in Donetsk where the French national football team will be based for the Euro 2012 football championships. The facilities were built for local club side Shakhtar Donetsk. AFP PHOTO/ ALEXANDER KHUDOTEPLY (Photo credit should read Alexander KHUDOTEPLY/AFP/Getty Images) In the last couple of decades the health and fitness industry has grown exponentially to become one of the UK’s most resilient business sectors, and despite the down turn experienced by many other industries in the last three or four years, health and fitness is still worth an estimated £3.8 billion to the UK economy[i]. It would seem that no matter how bad the economy gets, people still want to stay fit and healthy.Some people train to become fitness instructors upon leaving school or college, while other people come to the profession later in life, having decided it’s time for a complete change of direction. Whichever bracket you fall into, it’s important that you choose the right personal trainer courses and only opt for courses that are fully accredited by the Register of Exercise Professionals, such as The Training Room.Level 2 & 3The first step to becoming a personal trainer is the completion of a Level 2 Gym Instructor Course. All reputable personal training courses will ask to see this certificate before they accept you on to the course and if they don’t, be very wary of handing over any money to them. Once you have completed your Level 2 course then you can move on to Level 3 which is the level awarded by personal training coursesIn recent years the industry has become extremely competitive so it’s important to have a clear plan of where you want to go with your qualification once you receive it. . Having a few extra strings to your bow such as spinning  may also mean you are much more employable and this will help you get the experience you need in a gym before you can set out on your own with your own personal training business or seek a job in a gym or health club. If you think you would like to specialise in a particular area, such as weight loss or sports nutrition then it’s worth doing plenty of research to find personal training courses that suit your needs. After all, if you’re going to commit time and money to your new venture, it’s worth ensuring you sign up to the course that’s just right for you.Training around your own timeIf you’ve decided to become a personal trainer it might be difficult to drop all your existing work commitments and dedicate all your time to training for your new career. However, if you are able to do this you can gain personal training qualifications from the Training Room’s full-time course in just six weeks. If your existing work commitments dictate your free time, you can still set yourself up to achieve your new goals with the Training Room’s part-time courses, typically taking students between six and nine months to complete. You could also take advantage of their innovative e-learning platform enabling you to train from the comfort of your own home.Whatever, your personal training goals; to succeed it’s vital to choose the right personal trainer course for you as well as for your potential clients. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Five things we learnt: England v Fiji

first_imgGot your back: Mike Brown is taking to his role as a senior playerWatch out WalesAfter what happened in Brighton on Saturday, with Japan knocking over South Africa, nothing in this World Cup will surprise us. It would not be in the same league as rugby’s biggest upset if Fiji did the same to either Wales or Australia and that is a worry for those two teams, especially the Welsh. There are always moans that the smaller nations get knifed by the fixture list at the World Cup but this time it might just work in Fiji’s advantage. After playing Australia, on Wednesday, they have got an eight-day turnaround before they face Wales, who would have had only five days to recover from playing England. Wales obviously have more depth than the Islanders but they have had a few narrow squeaks against them before. Warren Gatland will have to play his cards cannily against a fully-refreshed Fiji side, who as we saw last week, can play a bit.Fiji threat: Nemani Nadolo gave England a torrid time and Wales awaitTo see all of Rugby World’s latest subscription deals click here The England midfield partnership is yet to click, TMO’s are here to stay, Mike Brown’s excellence and the Fijian threat are all covered… TAGS: Fiji Finishing touch: Billy Vunipola edges over to give England a precious bonus point By Adam HathawayBrad Barritt and Jonathan Joseph still to clickWe didn’t learn anything about this pair at all. Brad Barritt is reliable but when he makes an error it looks even worse because he seems to have nothing else in his armoury, despite his protestations, to make up for it in attack, while Joseph is a threat with the ball in hand and a bit of a gap. What is more worrying for England is the way they failed to gel – although only in their second start together – and time is seriously running out. Whisper it quietly but Sam Burgess could be starting for England at 12 sooner rather than later. He might not fix the midfield entirely, with Burgess you get what it says on the label, but he would give England more than the six metres go-forward Barritt managed against Fiji.Taking time to gel: Brad Barritt and Jonathan Joseph’s midfield partnership is taking time to bed inTMOs are a fact of life and won’t go awayThe Television Match Official is here to stay so we might as well get used to it, and if the technology gets the decisions right, surely that is the way to go, no? If Nikola Matawalu’s try on Friday had been given in the last minute of a World Cup final, and settled the game, the arguments would rage for longer than those about one of Geoff Hurst’s goals in 1966 or Bob Deans’ ‘try that never was’ for the All Blacks against Wales in 1905. If I have taken a day off work and travelled to a game, spent the best part of £300 on tickets, food, beers and the rest – then I couldn’t give a monkey’s if I have to spend a minute or so waiting for the correct decision to be arrived at. Television companies might have a word though if matches start encroaching on the 10 o’clock news. Mind you, they don’t always get it right. Just ask Mark Cueto.TMO palaver: Nikola Matawalu goes over for a try, which is later ruled outEngland need a bit more beefNo one thought they would see an English pack struggling at scrum-time in the World Cup but that is exactly what happened at Twickenham. It is easy to blame the props and hooker – although the loss of Dylan Hartley is hurting England here – but there is more to it than that. The props need someone with a bit of ballast behind them to give them a shove, which makes the absence of Dave Attwood from the 31-man squad even more baffling than it was in August. Being a second row is not entirely about running a line-out. As Dan Cole said at the weekend: “Would I like a 150kg, 6ft 10in lock behind me who who’ll make me look really good? Yes.” Nuff said. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Underpowered: The England scrum has struggled in recent weeksBrown the Lion HeartIf the British & Irish Lions were touring next week – so that means no Leigh Halfpenny – Mike Brown would have a more than decent shot at making the Test team. The full-back is showing no signs of his concussion suffered in the Six Nations and England would probably have been sunk without him against the Fijians. Even if you forget the two tries, both finished with typical Brown aggression, he also pulled off a try-saving tackle, caught everything in the air and has the knack of knowing when to kick and when to run. He is also Chris Robshaw’s right-hand man. Who was on Robshaw’s shoulder when it was kicking off in the Cardiff tunnel in February? Yep Brown. Robshaw couldn’t have taken a backward step even if he had wanted to, because Brown was right behind him.last_img read more

Six Nations Odds

first_imgIf you fancy a bet during the 2020 Six Nations here are the odds for the tournament. Six Nations Table 2021 Flutter: What are the odds for the Six Nations? (Getty Images) Expand Expand Expand Collapse Six Nations Fixtures 2022 Six Nations Venues Six Nations Table 2021 Six Nations Fixtures 2022 The 2022 Six Nations… Six Nations Fixtures 2022 Follow our Six Nations homepage which we update regularly with news and features.Also make sure you know about the Fixtures, Injuries, Table, Venues, TV Coverage by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram Who is leading the way in the Six… As you would expect Italy follow with odds as high of 1000/1 to win it all.Grand Slam OddsEngland are currently the favourites to win a Grand Slam too with odds of 6/4. Ireland are 9/1, Wales and France can both be found at 14/1, Scotland 100/1 and Italy are at 1500/1.You can also bet on there being no Grand Slam at all. That occurrence currently has odds of 5/4. We give the lowdown on the six venues… Six Nations Venues Six Nations TV Coverage 2021: BBC and ITV Matches Six Nations TV Coverage 2021: BBC and ITV Matches Six Nations OddsFancy a flutter during the 2020 Six Nations? Well below we have given you the odds on who will win the tournament and the odds on Grand Slams.Six Nations OddsTournament Winner OddsRight now, after their loss in the Rugby World Cup final to South Africa, England are the favourites to win the Six Nations with odds of 4/5.Ireland follow them with odds of 4/1 and then Wales have odds of roughly 5/1. Given how both teams have new head-coaches coming in this is an interesting development right now. Andy Farrell is coming in to replace the immensely successful Joe Schmidt with Ireland and Wayne Pivac is replacing Warren Gatland who will take up a role with the Chiefs in New Zealand.France, another team with a new head-coach in the form of Fabien Galthie, have odds of 11/2 and Scotland are as far down as 22/1 which isn’t really a surprise given how disastrously their World Cup went. Their losses to both Japan, Ireland failing to get out of their group has had a clear impact here. Take a look at what games are being… Who do you think is going to come out on top on when the tournament concludes in March? LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Matthieu Jalibert scores rare drop-goal for France in victory over Scotland

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Playmaker: Matthieu Jalibert was at ten for France (Getty Images) Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. This show of composure was impressive from the fly-half, brought in to start with Romain Ntamack out.As you will see below, a drop-goal is all too rare in the Test game these days (though it is worth noting that Moises Duque slotted one for Brazil against Uruguay recently). France fans will be delighted with the maturity shown by their playmakers. In fact, while there was a lot of fanfare about the most recent Six Nations player of the tourament, Antoine Dupont, in this one he was happy to draw defenders onto him and let others exploit the space. Matthieu Jalibert scores rare drop-goal for France in victory over ScotlandFrance exorcised the demons of their Six Nations loss at Murrayfield by defeating Scotland 22-15 in the Autumn Nations Cup.The visitors had the edge through forward grunt, set-piece power and one breakthrough try for Virimi Vakatawa on the other side of half-time. But Scotland still managed to keep in touch and could even have fought back in the end for a draw, had a late penalty kick from captain Stuart Hogg gone into touch rather than heading into the dead-ball area.French discipline was not where they will have wanted it either. However, a win’s a win for all that.And we saw a rare drop-goal for France! Check out this decisive move to get the telling try early in the second half. The fly-half slotted a three-pointer against Scotland France are now in the box seat in Pool B of the Autumn Nations Cup, and face Italy in France next week to end the pool stage. Win that and they are in line for a final with the top side in Pool A – a trip to Twickenham would be a gargantuan challenge and one to excite spectators.As for Scotland, they already know they have a 28-0 result, with Fiji unable to compete due to a Coronavirus outbreak in their ranks.last_img read more

Episcopal Women’s Caucus urges church to act on reproductive justice

first_img Christopher Johnson says: Steve Grech says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA [Episcopal Women’s Caucus] The Board of the Episcopal Women’s Caucus, a social justice advocacy group within the Episcopal Church, expresses our outrage at the current political discourse regarding reproductive justice. We are appalled by the misinformation that speaks of “forcible rape” as something different from ordinary rape and asserts that, in a “legitimate rape,” a woman will not get pregnant, because her body has a way to “shut that whole thing down.”Those of us who have worked to raise awareness about women’s rights and promoted changes in laws to more actively prosecute rapists, strengthen jail sentences, and help victims of rape and sexual assault find help and hope feel that we have back tracked in time. We are living a nightmare. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Second, the Episcopal Women’s Caucus supports Rev. Harry Knox, president and CEO of the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice, when he writes: Tags Rector Tampa, FL Rector Collierville, TN Louis Stanley Schoen says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Events First, we take a firm stand against any and all representatives, senators and other legislators who aim to limit the health care options any woman — particularly a raped and pregnant woman — has available to her. Submit a Press Release August 24, 2012 at 6:03 pm Thank you for the strong wording in this article. I cannot believe that any human being would stand behind Akin or his followers or other party members. Elizabeth R. Hallett says: August 27, 2012 at 9:08 am There’s an old expression: “If you’re not outraged, you’re not paying attention”.Those of us who have worked long and hard over many years for reproductive justice are, indeed, ‘outraged’ to hear the current level of discourse as well as the proposed political legislation to erode the gains made over the past few decades.The 1994 statement of the Episcopal Church regarding abortion still stands squarely on the classical Via Media of Anglicanism. You can find it here: http://www.episcopalarchives.org/cgi-bin/acts/acts_resolution-complete.pl?resolution=1994-A054It says, in part, “We regard all abortion as having a tragic dimension, calling for the concern and compassion of all the Christian community. While we acknowledge that in this country it is the legal right of every woman to have a medically safe abortion, as Christians we believe strongly that if this right is exercised, it should be used only in extreme situations. We emphatically oppose abortion as a means of birth control, family planning, sex selection, or any reason of mere convenience.”That was actually taken from Resolution C047 at the 61st General Convention. In 1994, we added this: “We believe that legislation concerning abortions will not address the root of the problem. We therefore express our deep conviction that any proposed legislation on the part of national or state governments regarding abortions must take special care to see that the individual conscience is respected, and that the responsibility of individuals to reach informed decisions in this matter is acknowledged and honored as the position of this Church; and be it further Resolved, That this 71st General Convention of the Episcopal Church express its unequivocal opposition to any legislative, executive or judicial action on the part of local, state or national governments that abridges the right of a woman to reach an informed decision about the termination of pregnancy or that would limit the access of a woman to safe means of acting on her decision.”Not everyone on either side of this issue is happy with that statement. Those who are opposed to abortion under ANY circumstance lament that their church is not more blatantly “pro-life”. Those who see that abortion can be a “blessing” to some women, lament that their church is not more aggressively “pro-choice”.Those of us who see some in our government trying to erode reproductive justice for women – even with the extremes of junk science which more than Mr. Aiken believe – are rightly and justifiably outraged. That’s because we’re paying attention, even as we continue to direct our energies toward reducing the reasons why women have abortions: poverty, education, access to affordable, quality health care, etc. October 26, 2012 at 11:53 pm It sounds like the arguments pro and con regarding women’s health care choices break down along gender lines, with women being outraged or at least disappointed, and men viewing it all with alarm. Inasmuch as medical science and medical research has had little to say about the physical difference and uniqueness of women’s bodies, to the extent that most research is historically abased on the male as “norm,” I woiuld say, that probably women should be the first consulted about these kinds of moral and spiritual issues, and men ought to defer to women’s unique experiences in their unique bodies. In otrher words, be still and listen. August 25, 2012 at 12:22 am Please. The guy misspoke. Those of us who are pro-life and actually live in Missouri know that Congressman Akin is not fit to be a US senator and are moving heaven and Earth to get another viable conservative candidate on the November ballot. But whatever Congressman Akin is, he is infinitely preferable to the abortion-for-any-reason-whatsoever zealots of Harry Knox’s RCRC. And for the Episcopal Women’s Caucus to try to use this occasion merely to try to score a few political points is deplorable and anti-Christian. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Washington, DC August 27, 2012 at 12:13 pm The men on this thread show how we need more women in legislative bodies that understand the issue of rape. It is clear that these men do not. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Job Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis October 26, 2012 at 11:39 pm Mr. Grech and Mr. Johnson: Please be careful lest you both mis-speak – the bogy man of “abortion for any reason whatsoever zealot” does not exist. What seems to exist here, is the inplication that these men know the real and acceptable reasons why women can’t be trusted to make decisions about their healthcare and family planning , but that even Todd Akin, bad as he may be, is morally and spiritually superior to women generally, who do not have the intelligence or moral sensitivity to decide when they may want or need to terminate a pregnancy. From where do these people get their authority to make such statements? The mis-speakers here may be thinking that they are better judges of what women should do about their health care, their privacy, their bodily integrity, and reproductive rights than women do. They define rape on their own terms, they make ridiculous statements about women’s anatomy, and claim their authority from God. It is doubtful that they have had any first hand experience with real women or with rape or incest, so trippingly do these insane statements flow off the tongue. And by what experience do they claim that God is their authority? Let’s have a little humility, gentlemen, and a little compassion, too. I think that comes from God. August 26, 2012 at 6:32 pm I agree with Mr Johnson. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Knoxville, TN elizabeth windsor says: Comments (17) August 27, 2012 at 12:11 pm Christopher, Mr. Akin did not misspeak. His words were very clear. He only backpedaled after the extreme backlash from people on both sides of the issue. I applaud the Episcopal Womens Caucus for taking a strong stand for women. August 27, 2012 at 8:57 am http://www.episcopalcafe.com/lead/faith_and_terror/episcopal_womens_caucus_stand_1.html the Rev’d Dr. Elizabeth Kaeton says: John D. Andrews says: Advocacy Peace & Justice, Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Tony Green says: John D. Andrews says: August 28, 2012 at 3:48 am Really? Than why are pro-lifers like me trying to get Akin to withdraw and are seriously considering voting for a third-party candidate or even Claire McCaskill herself if he doesn’t? If you believe that what Akin said represents pro-life beliefs than you know nothing whatsoever about pro-life beliefs. The fact that Todd Akin is stupid enough not to understand that what he said gave the Democrats a weapon that they’d be foolish not to exploit and arrogantly self-centered enough not to care is what will probably give Claire McCaskill six more years in the Senate.Let me put it this way. If the election seems close enough that my vote might matter, I’ll hold my nose and vote for Akin, secure in the knowledge that, if he wins, I’ll be able to vote for a much less embarrassing Republican candidate in 2018. But if it’s obvious to everyone in Missouri that Claire is going to take down this monster pot, handed to her by Todd Akin, then I’ll vote for some third-party candidate or other, secure in the knowledge that Todd Akin’s political career is finished. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Marlene Talbott-Green PhD says: Rector Martinsville, VA “Congressman Akin misunderstands the Biblical meaning of the word ‘justice.’ He talks about bringing rapists to justice, but he apparently doesn’t realize that true justice requires that a woman who has been raped have every resource available to her as she rebuilds her life after trauma. One of those resources must be the option to end a pregnancy caused by her rapist.” August 25, 2012 at 12:18 am We cannot defend too strongly the rights of women. We, as Americans, are so slow among the developed nations to welcome women into the eschelons of decision making, and the men need us!! We change the level of discourse when geiven the opportunity. Episcopalian men: where are you? In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Christopher Johnson says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Sue Dauer says: August 27, 2012 at 3:54 pm Mr. Johnson,He did not misspeak. Far from it. He claimed, without any scientific basis whatsoever, that women who are raped “legitimately” (as opposed to those who he believes are making false claims of rape) do not get pregnant. This hateful and ignorant statement harkens back to the 16th century witch hunts and the “ordeal by water” where an accused woman who sank was considered innocent of witchcraft (albeit, dead), while floating indicated witchcraft. To Akin, if a woman was really, legitimately raped, her body does not allow her to get pregnant, so there is no need for an abortion. To those who get pregnant, well they must have been asking for it, right? No abortion for them.This is not a misstatement of any sort whatsoever, it was a calculated, sickening statement. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Comments are closed. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Women’s Ministry the Rev’d Dr. Elizabeth Kaeton says: August 27, 2012 at 12:51 pm Rep. Akin did not “mispeak” — the fallacy he expressed has been promulgated by a doctor Mitt Romney is proud to call a supporter and has been oft repeated by politicians seeking to dictate the private medical care of women. It’s a misnomer to call these people “pro-life” — they are merely pro-birth. Witness their lack of concern for children born into poverty and their strident support for gutting public education for ample evidence of their “pro-life” hypocrisy. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Marlene Talbott-Green PhD says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books August 26, 2012 at 1:10 pm Couldn’t believe I was hearing that old saw again. We must speak up. The time has passed to let these comments to go by with no response. In turning nightmares into dreams of justice, the Episcopal Women’s Caucus will actively work to ensure that people are informed and not misinformed. We actively work to promote the well-being of all people. Each woman should have the right to choose how to best care for herself, her whole self. Because we are made in the image of God, and that is sacred.The Episcopal Women’s Caucus is a justice organization dedicated to Gospel values of equality and liberation and committed to the incarnation of God’s unconditional love. For more information, visit www.episcopalwomenscaucus.org. August 27, 2012 at 3:07 am I can’t tell you how the notion of “outrage” strikes me in general. When people of faith present themselves as “outraged,” I usually offer the comment, “So what?” In this context, someone got something wrong — an important thing, mind you. But I am not outraged. Upset or perturbed — maybe even pissed off, but not outraged. I get outraged when innocent people are being annihilated in Syria, while no one does anything. I get outraged when thousands die, when serums and the technology for clean water is readily available. I get outraged when the best technology we can come up with to resolve the perils of rape and traumatic pregnancy is termination. We are so cautious in the use of the scalpel in so many procedures, why are we so quick to suggest it in so many cases as a right? I get outraged when living things aren’t given the chance to live out their potential because of circumstances beyond their control –because of the trauma their presence will cause. Can we redirect the energy wasted in outrage to better purposes and strategies? Press Release Service An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR John Harrington says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Episcopal Women’s Caucus is committed to changing this nightmare, reinforcing and increasing acts of justice. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel August 29, 2012 at 8:20 pm Regardless of whether Mr. Aiken misspoke, the real nightmare is the suggestion that government assistance for killing a fetus because it was conceived by rape has anything to do with justice. Mr. Akin may want to turn the clock back to the 1960s, but it sounds like the Women’s Caucus want to turn it back to somewhere around the Bronze Age (see Exodus 20:5). Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Women’s Caucus urges church to act on reproductive justice Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab August 25, 2012 at 4:42 pm Strikes me that Mr. Johnson’s comment illustrates the need for EWC to highlight the issue and remind Episcopalians to contact their legislators if there’s any doubt about where they stand on it. Additionally, the Episcopal Women’s Caucus calls upon the membership and leadership of the Episcopal church — at international, national, diocesan and local levels — to write to their representatives, senators and other legislators to express their outrage and distress about this archaic ideology and deeply flawed theology that is the foundation of this political and anti-women position. Posted Aug 24, 2012 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Pamela. RW Kandt says: Rector Bath, NC Rector Smithfield, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit an Event Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Rev. Doris Mote says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group last_img read more

Obispos de la IX Provincia estudian el autosostén en las…

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Por Lynette WilsonPosted Oct 13, 2014 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Obispos de la IX Provincia pasaron del 24 al 28 de septiembre en las Filipinas estudiando la trayectoria de la Iglesia hacia el autosostén en el contexto local. Foto de Lynette Wilson para ENS.[Episcopal News Service – Manila, Filipinas] En talleres de costura, hogares y establos a cada lado de la carretera que llega hasta la cima de una loma donde se alza la iglesia episcopal de la Santa Fe [Holy Faith Episcopal Church] en la aldea de Igorot, los hombres tejen sombreros, bufandas y suéteres y las mujeres cosen etiquetas en prendas terminadas. Es una industria doméstica que comenzaran seis mujeres que venden artículos de punto a mayoristas. Eso mantiene la aldea activa.La aldea fue fundada en los años 50 [del pasado siglo] sobre un terreno de 1,5 hectárea de tierra que una vez formó parte del rancho ganadero de igorrotes, o “montañeses” de Luzón, la provincia insular más grande y más septentrional de Filipinas donde los misioneros anglicanos establecieron su presencia a fines del siglo XIX. Localizada en las afueras de Manila, la aldea de chozas de bambú y hierbas, ahora es el asiento de 100 familias que viven en casas de concreto con techos de metal.El Rdo. Echanes A. Codiogan posa con algunas mujeres de la cooperativa. Foto de Lynette Wilson para ENS.En la medida en que se desarrollaba una comunidad, la [original] estación de predicación se convirtió en la misión de la Sagrada Familia, en parroquia ayudada y, finalmente, en 2010, solicitó un rector de jornada completa.Sin embargo, en 2013, en un momento cuando la parroquia ya se autosostenía en un 80 por ciento, la congregación sintió que no podía alcanzar el objetivo del 100 por ciento para 2018. Es ahí donde tiene lugar la iniciativa singular de la Iglesia Episcopal de las Filipinas de el Desarrollo de la Comunidad Basado en Recursos, una estrategia que incluye el desarrollo congregacional aplicado. Al hacer inventario de los activos de la aldea, los líderes determinaron que los mayoristas venderían en consignación de tres meses, y entre tanto tomarían préstamos particulares para mantener las operaciones; y la Iglesia intervino para responder a una necesidad.Con un préstamo de $11.000 de 22 comunidades de la Diócesis del Sur de Filipinas, la Santa Fe comenzó a hacer préstamos a los mayoristas con un interés del 1,5 por ciento, menos de la mitad de la tasa del 3 al 5 por ciento que imponen las entidades crediticias privadas. En una decisión en que todas las partes salieron ganando, los mayoristas invirtieron un porcentaje de los ahorros en la Iglesia. En febrero de 2014, los miembros de la Santa Fe solicitaron estatus parroquial pleno.El trabajo en piedra de la iglesia de la Santa Fe se inspira en la provincia montañosa del norte, de donde provienen los igorrotes. Foto de Lynette Wilson para ENS.La Santa Fe es sólo un ejemplo de la Iglesia Episcopal de las Filipinas donde el desarrollo comunitario y congregacional han marchado de la mano, creando una situación donde ambos [comunidad y congregación] prosperan.Cuando la Iglesia comenzó a pensar en la autonomía y en el autosostén económico, invirtió en programas y proyectos para recaudar dinero, pero al final, sin el componente de desarrollo comunitario, las inversiones fueron un “completo fracaso”, dijo Floyd Lalwet, secretario provincial de la Iglesia, durante una reunión, el 24 de septiembre, en la oficina nacional de la Iglesia en la Ciudad de Quezón. Con el tiempo, la Iglesia comenzó a ver las comunidades y las congregaciones como una [sola entidad] y las cosas comenzaron a cambiar.La trayectoria de la Iglesia Episcopal en las Filipinas hacia el autosostén económico sirve como ejemplo de la asociación pactada, que puede replicarse en otros contextos.En las primeras horas de esa jornada del 24 de septiembre, siete obispos y dos cónyuges en representación de la IX Provincia viajaron a las Filipinas con el propósito de afirmar y fortalecer la relación de compañerismo entre la Iglesia Episcopal en las Filipinas y la Iglesia Episcopal en Estados Unidos, y experimentar la labor de la iglesia local como relacionada con su logro de alcanzar la plena autonomía económica y, más específicamente, la puesta en práctica de su Desarrollo Congregacional/Comunitario Basado en Recursos y la aplicación de su política “de receptores a dadores”.Antes de viajar a las Filipinas para estudiar la trayectoria de la Iglesia hacia el autosostén económico, los obispos y sus cónyuges estuvieron del 17 al 23 en Taiwán asistiendo a la reunión de otoño de la Cámara de Obispos, en la cual el obispo primado [de Filipinas] Edward P. Malecdan habló acerca del contexto teológico y las dificultades a que se enfrenta la misión en las Filipinas.Fieles al tema de “expandir la imaginación apostólica”, los obispos exploraron la misión y el ministerio de la Diócesis de Taiwán. Luego de terminada la reunión otros obispos y sus cónyuges viajaron a Japón, Hong Kong y Corea del Sur para continuar aprendiendo acerca de la misión y el ministerio de la Iglesia Anglicana.Los hombres tejen sombreros, bufandas y suéteres en talleres como estos en la aldea Igorot. Foto de Lynette Wilson para ENS.La visita de los obispos de la IX Provincia a las Filipinas estuvo preparándose durante tres años.Clérigos y líderes laicos de las siete diócesis latinoamericanas de la Iglesia Episcopal, que se extienden por partes del Caribe, Centro y Sudamérica, conocieron por primera vez la historia de la Iglesia Episcopal de las Filipinas en una conferencia sobre autosostén que se celebro en Tela, Honduras, en 2011.Las diócesis de la IX Provincia —República Dominicana, Honduras, Ecuador Central, Ecuador Litoral, Colombia, Venezuela y Puerto Rico—adoptaron el autosostén como punto focal en una reunión sinodal en 2012.Cada una de las diócesis de la IX Provincia sigue su propio rumbo hacia el autosostén económico, de las cuales la República Dominicana, Honduras y Ecuador Central, con una reciente venta de tierras por $4 millones, están más cerca de alcanzarlo que las demás.La estrategia global para la sostenibilidad económica en la IX Provincia está motivada por las necesidades de cada diócesis individual, y la estrategia parte de las diócesis mismas, dijo Samuel McDonald, subdirector de operaciones y director de misión de la Iglesia Episcopal.“Aquí es dónde la teoría se pone a prueba”, afirmó.En febrero de 2014, el Consejo Ejecutivo adoptó el Plan de Sostenibilidad de la IX Provincia [en conformidad con] la Segunda Marca de la Misión, que fue el resultado de una reunión en julio de 2013 de líderes laicos y ordenados de la provincia y del personal del centro denominacional.Luego de la conferencia de Tela, dijo Lalwet, los obispos de la IX Provincia comenzaron a hacer preguntas específicas sobre la capacidad de la Iglesia de Filipinas de crear proyectos y procesos, específicamente sobre la manera en que las cooperativas han ayudado a las congregaciones a convertirse en parroquias de pleno derecho y sobre la Fundación Episcopal para el Desarrollo de San Marcos, una institución de préstamo que transformó la Diócesis de Santiago en el norte de Filipinas.Hay unas 43 cooperativas inscritas y otras 65 cooperativas, asociaciones de agricultores y organizaciones para el desarrollo no inscritas que funcionan según el modelo de desarrollo eclesial y comunitario de la Iglesia. La Fundación Episcopal de Asistencia o ECARE, como se llama el modelo de desarrollo, aspira a colaborar, mediante la asociación, con comunidades para lograr que sus activos y recursos pasen del nivel de subsistencia al de autosuficiencia, al tiempo que ponen énfasis en compartir, asistir [a los necesitados], dar testimonio y ejercer la mayordomía medioambiental.El concepto de cooperativa fue algo nuevo para el obispo Francisco Duque,, de la Diócesis de Colombia, quien también funge como presidente de la IX Provincia; algo, dijo él, que contemplaría poner en práctica en su propia diócesis una de las más jóvenes de la Iglesia Episcopal.En Colombia, como en las Filipinas y en las otras diócesis de la IX Provincia, muchas iglesias episcopales están localizadas en comunidades pobres y marginadas, carentes de desarrollo económico y social.Más del 25 por ciento de los 100 millones de filipinos vive por debajo del nivel de la pobreza, un porcentaje semejante al del Ecuador y Venezuela, aunque sus poblaciones son una fracción de la de Filipinas, según estadísticas del Banco Mundial. Cada una de las otra diócesis de la IX Provincia tiene un porcentaje mayor de personas, entre el 33 y el 65 por ciento, que vive por debajo del nivel de la pobreza.“La realidad económica y política es que nuestra gente vive en la pobreza y que nuestras iglesias están situadas en comunidades marginales”, dijo Lalwet, añadiendo que al concentrarse en mejorar la subsistencia económica de las personas de la comunidad, éstas son más capaces de sostener la Iglesia.Esta estrategia, sin embargo, necesita del consenso de la Iglesia y de la comunidad desde el comienzo, afirmó. “También sería un error separar el programa de desarrollo de la comunidad del desarrollo de la Iglesia”.Eso significó también un cambio de mentalidad, en congregaciones que históricamente han sido receptoras y que debían convertirse en dadoras. “Estamos rompiendo con la mentalidad de que la Iglesia debe sostener a las congregaciones”, dijo Lalwet.Trasfondo históricoLa Iglesia Episcopal estableció un distrito misionero en las Filipinas en 1898; en 1965, la Iglesia se convirtió en una diócesis misionera y, en 1990, la Iglesia Episcopal de las Filipinas llegó a ser una provincia autónoma de la Comunión Anglicana. Sin embargo, la autonomía llegó ante que el autosostén económico: en 1990, la Iglesia de las Filipinas aún dependía de la Iglesia Episcopal en los Estados Unidos para financiar el 60 por ciento de su presupuesto operativo.En 1992, El Comité Conjunto sobre el Pacto Filipino propuso un plan de reducción escalonada de 15 años para reducir gradualmente, cada cinco años, el apoyo de la Iglesia Episcopal de $800.000 a $533.333 a $267.667. En 2003, la Iglesia Filipina alcanzó el mayor déficit presupuestario de su historia, 6,5 millones de pesos ($120.000 en ese momento). Y en 2004, la Iglesia decidió pedirle a la Iglesia Episcopal una extensión de tres años antes de cambiar el rumbo.En 14 años de autonomía, todos siempre hablaban acerca del subsidio, contó Lalwet, hasta que finalmente alguien propuso: ¿Por qué no prescindimos de él?”.Así lo hicieron, y el 1 de enero de 2005 “todo el mundo predijo que el déficit de 6,5 millones de pesos se duplicaría”, pero no sucedió. En lugar de eso, la Iglesia tenía por primera vez un superávit de $55.000.Lalwet con frecuencia compara el período de 15 años de la atenuación del subsidio con el período de abstinencia inicial que atraviesa un adicto. “Hubo temporadas en que la gente estuvo seis meses sin salario”, agregó.La relación de pacto entre la Iglesia Episcopal en los Estados Unidos y la Iglesia Episcopal en las Filipinas se mantenía intacta en 2005, pero en lugar de utilizar el subsidio para gastos operativos, el dinero se añadió al Fondo de Donaciones del Centenario, que se estableció en 2001.Para alentar a que las seis diócesis de entonces contribuyeran al fondo, la Iglesia cambió la estructura del fondo. En lugar de consolidar el fondo de donaciones en un “fondo nacional” con dineros que fueran a sostener la Iglesia Episcopal de las Filipinas, la Iglesia dividió el fondo entre las diócesis, utilizó una subvención e ingresos por concepto de alquileres para proporcionar fondos complementarios y le prestó el dinero a las diócesis para inversiones locales, dijo Lalwet.Además de eso, explicó Lalwet, en lugar de depender del subsidio para su presupuesto operativo, la Iglesia buscó apoyo en sus activos existentes y en instituciones; durante el período 2005-2008, con el apoyo del Centro Médico San Lucas en Quezón, se construyeron algunas de las iglesias más bellas de la provincia.En la actualidad, hay más de 120.000 episcopales bautizados que asisten al culto en 400 iglesias de las siete diócesis de la Iglesia Episcopal en las Filipinas que abarca todo el archipiélago en el océano Pacífico.Cooperativas de desarrolloEn los años 60 y 70 [del pasado siglo], cuando la Iglesia comenzó a considerar la autonomía por primera vez, empezó a fundar cooperativas, lo cual resultaba peligroso durante el período de la ley marcial, de 1972 a 1981, puesta en vigor por el presidente Ferdinand Marcos.“Las cooperativas se consideraban subversivas”, dijo Lalwet, añadiendo que la Iglesia, específicamente la Diócesis de Luzón Norte, al frente de la cual estaba el obispo Richard Abellon, que se convertiría en el primer filipino en llegar a Primado [de esa Iglesia]. “El obispo se convirtió en el enemigo público número uno”.A pesar del acoso y de las amenazas que dirigían contra Abellon y otros, la Iglesia continuó fundando cooperativas porque el liderazgo creía que ése era el camino a seguir.SantiagoTras un vuelo de 40 minutos rumbo norte, de Manila a Tuguegarao, más otras dos o tres horas en una furgoneta a lo largo de una calzada de dos carriles que se adentra en los grandes arrozales del país, donde el maíz amarillo para alimento del ganado y el arroz se secan en el estrecho borde de la carretera o en cualquier trozo de pavimento que no se use y que tenga acceso directo a la luz solar, los obispos llegaron a Santiago, donde la inversión local ha definido el éxito de esa diócesis.Los obispos Julio Cesar Holguín, Orlando Guerrero y Luis Ruiz posan con miembros de la cooperativa de San Pedro. Foto de Lynette Wilson para ENS.La Diócesis de Santiago, que anteriormente formaba parte de la Diócesis de Luzón, fue fundada en 2001, y en ese tiempo el 90 por ciento de su sostén provenía de fuera de la diócesis.“Esta diócesis se formó durante los años económicamente más difíciles de nuestra Iglesia, cuando el apoyo de la Iglesia Episcopal empezaba a reducirse, cuando estábamos pasando por [el síndrome de] la abstinencia”, dijo Lalwet. “Esta diócesis sufrió porque era muy dependiente de la Iglesia Episcopal de las Filipinas.No fue fácil, explicó Lalwet, ya que las relaciones, algunas de ellas amistades de mucho tiempo, se pusieron muy tensas como un resultado de la eliminación del subsidio.Sin embargo, al final, la diócesis comenzó la Fundación Episcopal para el Desarrollo de San Marcos, la institución de préstamo que ha acumulado una carpeta de préstamos de $1.900.000 en 10 años, y que, entre otras cosas, ha permitido que los agricultores adquieran 30 hectáreas de tierra. Pero también es la mayor fuente de apoyo para la Diócesis de Santiago, a la que contribuye con $56.000 anuales.Además de visitar la oficina diocesana, donde se informaron acerca de la Fundación de San Marcos y compartieron una comida con el clero y los líderes laicos de las diócesis de Luzón Norte y de Santiago, los obispos visitaron dos cooperativas en muy diferentes etapas de desarrollo.La primera fue la Del Pilar, en Alicia, donde la mayoría de los 3.000 habitantes de la comunidad son agricultores que trabajan manualmente de 1 a 4 hectáreas de tierra con búfalos de agua. La Iglesia en 2002 estableció la Cooperativa de Ahorros y Crédito San Pedro con 15 miembros, los cuales desde entonces han ascendido a 39. La cooperativa le permite a los agricultores negociar mejores precios para las semillas, alquilar un espacio para el secado (el acceso al espacio para secar arroz y maíz es escaso) y ha construido una nave donde los granos pueden almacenarse y venderse según lo dicten los precios del producto. La cooperativa también tiene una finca arrocera de nueve hectáreas.La de San Pedro siguió el patrón de la segunda cooperativa, Misión y Cooperativa para fines múltiples del Espíritu Santo, que se inició en 1995 y que sigue funcionando, explicó el Rdo. Ralph Dampo, que presta servicios como director de la parroquia y administrador de la cooperativa.Dampo, que ha sido entrenado tanto de teología como de administración de empresas con el apoyo de la Iglesia, comenzó la misión con el objetivo simultáneo de mejorar las vidas y la subsistencia económica de los agricultores en la comunidad y la vida de la estación misionera.Después de llevar a cabo la primera evaluación rural: un tasación de la tierra, el número de familias, idiomas, acceso a servicios sociales y educacionales, la cooperativa comenzó con 16 agricultores de subsistencia, cada uno de los cuales contribuyó con un quinto de su ingreso anual, alrededor de 1.000 pesos o $22. “Fue difícil” dijo Dampo.La iglesia del Espíritu Santo fue construida en 2009. Foto de Lynette Wilson para ENS.En la actualidad, la cooperativa tiene más de 100 miembros, 10 empleados regulares, un almacén, un suelo de secado y camiones. Contribuye el 10 por ciento de sus ingresos al fondo parroquial y a otros fondos, paga el 70 por ciento del salario de Dampo, al tiempo que sostiene el ministerio infantil del Espíritu Santo y tiene un programa de alimentación y un ministerio de ayuda y rehabilitación.La primera iglesia se construyó en 1997 y un edificio moderno en 2009. El Espíritu Santo tiene 200 miembros, la mitad de ellos miembros también de la cooperativa, y la asistencia dominical promedio es de 70, dijo Dampo.CotabatoDesde su base en la ciudad de Quezón, los obispos viajaron luego al sur, una hora y media en avión, para llegar a la ciudad de Cotabato donde se reunieron con Danilo Bustamante, obispo de la Diócesis del Sur de Filipinas, visitaron la iglesia de San Francisco y la Cooperativa de Objetivos Múltiples Hillside en Upi, en la provincia de Magindanao en la Región Autónoma del Mindanao Musulmán, donde, por constituir tan sólo el 30 por ciento de la población, los cristianos son la minoría.El grupo también se reunió con el alcalde de Upi, Ramón A. Piang, en su oficina municipal , donde él les dijo que el gobierno local apoya a los líderes religiosos, y que ha instituido paneles cívicos, en los que participan líderes religiosos y de la sociedad civil. Y coordina con ellos sobre programas para la reducción de la pobreza en la provincia donde el 98 por ciento de las personas son campesinas.Ver las cooperativas en acción en las Filipinas le hizo pensar al obispo Orlando Guerrero, de Venezuela, en la plantación de café, de aproximadamente 35 hectáreas, que su diócesis posee en el noreste del país, una plantación que no está produciendo al máximo de su rendimiento. Más que poner a funcionar la plantación con fuerza laboral de la localidad, Guerrero dijo que estaba considerando la creación de una cooperativa y darles parcelas a las familias locales para que las trabajen.La Cooperativa de Objetivos Múltiples Hillside en Upi tiene una plantación de gomeros. Foto de Lynette Wilson para ENS.El gobierno de Venezuela, añadió, trabaja también con organizaciones religiosas para fortalecer a las comunidades, pero que hasta la fecha la Iglesia Episcopal, a diferencia de las iglesias evangélicas y Católico Romana, no se ha aprovechado de esa oportunidad.Las cooperativas también llevaron a pensar al obispo Lloyd Allen, de la diócesis de Honduras, en el modo en que la actual cooperativa de su diócesis podría reestructurarse para proporcionarle a cada uno de los 10 deanatos de Honduras más autoridad local.El programa del Sur de Filipinas en Upi, al igual que en el norte, incluye secado de granos e instalaciones de almacenamiento, pero también una plantación de gomeros y un vivero, este último en asociación con la Diócesis de Olympia en Seattle, Washington, que distribuye semilleros a familias individuales.Se hace camino al andar“Estamos aquí como una sola Iglesia… venimos aquí de América Latina para ver con nuestros propios ojos”, dijo la Rda. Glenda McQueen, funcionaria encargada de asociaciones globales de la Iglesia Episcopal para la América Latina y el Caribe, durante un sermón que predicó en la iglesia de San Francisco en Upi, en la mañana del 28 de septiembre.“Cambiar el rumbo es decirle que sí a la vida, abandonar el pasado, la manera en que se hacían las cosas, y asumir el riesgo del futuro”.McQueen habló acerca de cómo las iglesias anglicanas y episcopales plantaron la simiente que hoy es la Iglesia en las Filipinas, y cómo, al igual que los gomeros, así como injertar una rama de un árbol maduro en un vástago robustece al árbol nuevo y lo hace más resistente a las enfermedades, el que las Filipinas comparta su trayectoria hacia el autosostén económico fortalece a las iglesias latinoamericanas que están en una senda semejante.“Somos ese vástago, y ustedes nos han dado el ejemplo de esa nueva Iglesia que asumió el riesgo”, dijo McQueen, y explicó a los presentes que en América Latina se dice “se hace camino al andar”, lo cual describe la trayectoria que los obispos de la IX Provincia y sus diócesis han emprendido ahora.El avanzar hacia el autosostén en cada diócesis de la IX Provincia requerirá de una persona o de un equipo que supervise el proceso de desarrollo, dijo McQueen posteriormente en una entrevista con ENS.El obispo Danilo Bustamante, de la Diócesis de Filipinas Sur, y la Rda. Glenda McQueen, encargada de asociaciones globales para América Latina y el Caribe, en Cotabato. Foto de Lynette Wilson para ENS.Visitar la Iglesia en las Filipinas le proporcionó a los obispos los principios que sostienen el proceso —“necesitan tener ese cimiento”, dijo ella.Es importante, añadió, que las iglesias latinoamericanas expresen su propia visión de futuro, y que juntas miren lo que tienen como provincia.Reflexionando sobre la visita a la Iglesia de las Filipinas, el obispo de la República Dominicana Julio César Holguín dijo que él creía en el espíritu empresarial del clero y el laicado frente a la falta de apoyo de la Iglesia Episcopal y que el Espíritu les permitía a ellos continuar su [proceso de] desarrollo.“Creo que el liderazgo emprendedor asumido tanto por el clero como por el laicado de la iglesia en Las Filipinas, ha tenido mucho que ver con los logros alcanzados en el aspecto de su sostenibilidad. Cuando los recursos económicos  procedentes de la Sociedad Misionera, la Iglesia Episcopal, dejaron de llegar ellos no se sentaron a lamentarse ni a llorar, sino que elaboraron un plan estratégico viable, que les permitió mantener la continuidad en el desarrollo de la obra misionera que tienen por delante, basada en el empoderamiento y en una buena mayordomía por parte de cada uno de los miembros de la Iglesia. Creo que el modelo de la Iglesia en Las Filipinas, puede servir de gran ayuda e inspiración, para que tanto las diócesis de la IX Provincia, como de otras latitudes de la Comunión Anglicana, nos animemos a lanzarnos a alcanzar la meta de la sostenibilidad, para llevar a cabo con mas eficiencia, la tarea de la Gran Comisión que nuestro Señor Jesucristo nos ha encargado”.– Lynette Wilson es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. 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St. Paul’s shelters the homeless during northern California’s floods

first_img Tags Comments (1) In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 St. Paul’s regular coffee hour turned into lunch on Jan. 8 as people without shelter joined parishioners in the church’s parish hall. Photo: Elizabeth Gore[Diocese of Northern California] It may signal the end of a long, hard drought for California, but the storm that blew in the weekend after New Year’s also brought flooding and misery, especially for those without permanent shelter.But St. Paul’s in downtown Healdsburg, Sonoma County, was ready for the influx of homeless people displaced from makeshift camps along the Russian River by the rising waters. And they did it by marshaling the resources of an entire community.On Jan. 8, the river crested at close to 20 feet near Healdsburg – 23 feet is considered flood stage according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration – and people who call the riverbank home had to be moved quickly to safer areas.The Rev. Sally Hubbell, priest-in-charge of St. Paul’s, said in a phone interview that she began making plans ahead of the projected storm with Colleen Carmichael, a parishioner and executive director of North Sonoma County Services, whose mission is to end homelessness in northern Sonoma County. Weather forecasts were predicting that Northern California was due to be hit by what’s known as an “atmospheric river,” or water vapor in the atmosphere that changes to rain or snow when it makes landfall. The last major event of that kind in California happened in 2005 and caused $300 million in damage, according to news reports.Alerted on Facebook that St. Paul’s needed dry clothes for people displaced by flooding, the Healdsburg community donated bags of clothing. Photo: Elizabeth GoreHubbell and Carmichael arranged for cots to be brought into the church parish hall and volunteers from the church and the community to staff an emergency shelter.The advanced planning turned out to be fortuitous.“Around 6 or 6:30 [on Sunday morning] we got a call saying people’s camps had been washed out,” Hubbell said. “And we started getting people coming into our parish hall.”Sonoma County counts 2,906 homeless people; with about 155 in Healdsburg. More than 30 people sought shelter at St. Paul’s on Jan. 8; 16 spent the night.“This storm was a reminder that we have a community that is impacted more than others during these types of events,” said Carmichael in a statement. “We were grateful to all the people in the community who came together to help those in need.”Community members kept on showing up. On the evening of Jan. 8, after the people staying over were already resting on their cots, a person unknown to the volunteers delivered five pizzas to the temporary shelter.One of the reasons St. Paul’s was able to mobilize so quickly is that it has a long tradition of service to the homeless, and is a focal point for coordinated efforts with government agencies and nearby churches.St. Paul’s hosts a regular shower ministry from Tuesday to Friday every week, providing an essential service for those without shelter.  It also founded a group that managed 11 units of transitional housing owned by the city; that group eventually became the non-profit North Sonoma County Services.Hospitality celebrated through communal meals is another tradition at St. Paul’s. The church has a large coffee hour on Sunday, along with three services, plus a community meal in the evening where a group of area churches offers a meal and hospitality at St. Paul’s. On Jan. 8, it was the Healdsburg Adventist Church’s turn to provide a meal, and there were also “lots of other food donations,” Hubbell said.Neighbors and parishioners also donated clothing, much needed by people who got soaked in the rain.Still another faith community, Healdsburg Community Church, answered the call and brought food to St. Paul’s on the morning of Jan. 9 to provide breakfast for those seeking sustenance and shelter.It was fitting that in her Jan. 8 sermon celebrating the Baptism of Our Lord, Hubbell preached about “a partnership in righteousness.”“How about when one person washes dirty towels for the shower ministry, delivers them folded and clean, and another person hands them out to people who have come to take showers,” she said. “The whole shower ministry at St. Paul’s is a partnership in righteousness!”The weather system that drenched the region over the Jan. 7-8 weekend passed, but Jan. 9 brought more rain and falling temperatures.The partnership between St. Paul’s, its faith partners and its community will continue, Hubbell said, with the church committed to keeping the temporary shelter open until the storm has abated. Further down the road, the church hopes to find and support more programs that offer solutions to the complex problems of homelessness.— Paula Schaap is communications director in the Diocese of Northern California.  Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET St. Paul’s shelters the homeless during northern California’s floods Rector Bath, NC January 11, 2017 at 6:39 pm Perfect. Peace…. Comments are closed. 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Richard OSF says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Tampa, FL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Events Press Release Servicelast_img read more

L’eau : bien commun ou marchandise ?

first_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate Diocese of Nebraska New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA L’eau : bien commun ou marchandise ? 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VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Shreveport, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Rector Albany, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL de Lynette WilsonPosted Mar 31, 2017 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Job Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Smithfield, NC [Episcopal News Service] La demande en eau devrait augmenter de 55 % d’ici 2030, selon les prévisions et, dans le même temps, il est possible que les ressources globales en eau ne répondent qu’à 60 % des besoins mondiaux.« L’Afrique, l’Inde, le Moyen-Orient et l’Australie sont en crise », a déclaré Maude Barlow, ancienne conseillère principale aux Nations Unies, responsable de la question de l’eau et auteure, militante politique et critique politique. Certains disent que « la solution à la crise de l’eau est la marchandisation de l’eau », a-t-elle ajouté, lors de la séance du 23 mars sur le thème : « l’eau : bien commun ou marchandise », dans le cadre de la conférence mondiale intitulée Water Justice, qui s’est tenue du 22 au 24 mars à Trinity Church Wall Street à New York et par webcast au niveau mondial.Le révérend Brandon Mauai, diacre du diocèse du Dakota du Nord et membre de la Nation sioux de Standing Rock a parlé de l’appui de l’Église épiscopale à la Nation sioux de Standing Rock, elle et ses alliés ayant lutté contre le tracé de l’oléoduc de Dakota Access. Photo : Leo Sorel/Trinity Wall StreetLe but de la conférence était de présenter des directives pour encourager les initiatives individuelles, des congrégations et la communauté de foi au sens large, en faveur d’une « justice de l’eau »,  dans les domaines de l’accès à l’eau, de la sécheresse, de la pollution, de l’élévation du niveau des mers et des inondations. Water Justice est la 46e conférence annuelle organisée par Trinity Institute, les conférences passées ayant traité de justice raciale et d’inégalité économique.Si les Grands Lacs, le plus vaste système d’eau douce de surface sur terre, « étaient pompés aussi impitoyablement que les eaux souterraines, ils seraient asséchés en 80 ans », avertit Maude Barlow. La Mer d’Aral en Russie, jadis le quatrième plus grand lac d’eau douce au monde, est à présent réduite à 10 % de sa dimension antérieure. La moitié des eaux de Chine, pays riche en eau, ont disparu. Sao Paulo, la deuxième plus grande ville du monde, est frappée par la sécheresse parce que la destruction rapide de la forêt tropicale d’Amazonie a diminué les nuages de vapeur d’eau qui transportaient l’eau jusqu’au centre et au sud du Brésil.Tout ceci se produit, explique Maude Barlow, alors que les sociétés, les gouvernements et la Banque mondiale envisagent un marché mondial de l’eau, avec à terme des contrats pour vendre l’eau comme le pétrole et le gaz.« [L’eau] est-elle un droit de l’homme, un bien d’intérêt public ou un actif privé ? » demande Maude Barlow.Comme l’a souligné Christiana Zenner Peppard, professeure à Fordham University, théologienne et spécialiste de l’eau douce, dans sa réponse à l’intervention de Maude Barlow, un être humain ne peut survivre au delà de sept jours sans eau.L’« eau n’est pas remplaçable par quoi que ce soit d’autre, c’est le référentiel pour les systèmes humain, écologique et planétaire », poursuit-elle. « On ne peut pas parler d’eau et de justice comme de deux choses séparées ».En termes de valeurs et d’éthique religieuses de l’eau : « elle est fondamentale à la vie et comprise comme une ressource finie » et, pour le moins du point de vue chrétien, l’accès à l’eau signifie se préoccuper des « plus petits d’entre nous ».À la suite de l’intervention de Maude Barlow et de la réponse de Christiana Peppard, le public présent à Trinity a écouté les récits de trois intervenants confrontés à trois formes très différentes de crises de l’eau.Trois ans après la crise de l’eau à Flint (État du Michigan), les habitants continuent à dépendre de l’eau en bouteille pour leurs besoins en boissons et hygiène, a déclaré Nakiya Wakes, militante et porte-parole de Flint Rising, une coalition d’organisations communautaires qui préparent les habitants de Flint pour le long terme.« On nous a menti pendant trop longtemps et nous n’avons pas confiance en notre gouvernement », a-t-elle expliqué. « Cela fait trois ans que nous buvons de l’eau en bouteille… nous n’avons pas accès à l’eau potable aux États-Unis d’Amérique. Ils appellent le Michigan « Pure Michigan » et nous sommes purement empoisonnés ».Le révérend Brandon Mauai, diacre du diocèse du Dakota du Nord et membre de la Nation sioux de Standing Rock a parlé de l’appui de l’Église épiscopale à la Nation sioux de Standing Rock, elle et ses alliés ayant lutté contre le tracé de l’oléoduc de Dakota Access. Le tracé de l’oléoduc de 1 885 km passait à l’origine près de Bismarck (État du Dakota du Nord) mais a été modifié après que les habitants ont exprimé leur préoccupation par rapport à un accident qui contaminerait l’eau potable de la ville. Au lieu de cela, l’oléoduc passe sous le fleuve Missouri au lac Oahe, réservoir qui fournit l’eau pour la réserve de Standing Rock et d’autres en aval.En septembre 2016, des fonctionnaires fédéraux ont interrompu la construction de l’oléoduc sur les terres bordant ou sous le lac Oahe qui appartiennent à l’Army Corps of Engineers des États-Unis, l’agence fédérale chargée des autorisations sur les terres publiques et les voies fluviales. En décembre, le président Barack Obama a bloqué la construction sur le segment contesté de l’oléoduc.« Nous allons continuer à parler à quiconque nous écoutera. L’Église continuera à jouer un rôle actif, nous avons participé activement au nettoyage… nous continuerons à faire ce que la tribu a besoin que nous fassions en tant qu’Église, nous serons là pour apporter une aide de toutes les façons possibles », a-t-il déclaré.Des milliers d’épiscopaliens ont rejoint ceux qui soutiennent la Nation sioux, le plus récemment pour la manifestation et rassemblement Native Nations Rise, le 10 mars à Washington.L’archevêque Winston Halapua, l’un des trois primats de l’Église anglicane en Polynésie et à Aotearoa en Nouvelle-Zélande, responsables des congrégations samoanes, tongiennes, indo-fidjiennes et fidjiennes, a parlé de son enfance et comment il a grandi à Tonga, où sa vie était synchronisée avec le cycle des marées.La montée du niveau de la mer continue à engloutir des îles entières dans le Pacifique, où l’Église anglicane d’Aotearoa en Nouvelle-Zélande et de Polynésie établit une « stratégie claire de résilience » pour renforcer ses moyens face à de futures catastrophes naturelles dans les îles du Pacifique.« L’eau est le reflet de Dieu, vous et moi ne vivons pas sans eau », a conclu Winston Halapua.Article complet en anglais. Rector Tampa, FL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Washington, DClast_img read more

Preaching politics in polarized times

first_imgPreaching politics in polarized times By Dan WebsterPosted Apr 3, 2017 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET [Episcopal Diocese of Maryland] Every preacher has heard this or something similar: “Politics has no place in the pulpit.” It would seem we’ve heard this sentiment more in the past year. It’s on the mind of many preachers these days.So the Rt. Rev. Eugene Taylor Sutton, bishop of Maryland, and the Rt. Rev. Chilton R. Knudsen, assistant bishop, recently gathered nearly 60 clergy at the Claggett Conference Center in Adamstown, Maryland, to consider preaching that’s pastoral, prophetic and political. They heard from two Episcopal clergy who have preached to presidents, government leaders and politicians of all stripes.The Rev. Luis Leon, rector of St. John’s, Lafayette Park, across from the White House, and the Rt. Rev. Nathan Baxter, retired bishop of Central Pennsylvania, shared their experiences and how they have wrestled with preaching that’s faithful to the gospel message.The Rev. Luis Leon, left, and Bishop Nathan Baxter share a light moment before their presentations to Maryland clergy on preaching about political issues. Photo: Diocese of MarylandBaxter, dean of the Washington National Cathedral from 1992-2003, said, “I used to say the Canterbury pulpit [at the National Cathedral] was a bully pulpit, but not a pulpit to bully people.” God loves all people, he said, even those who disagree with us.Baxter acknowledged some congregations call clergy and expect them to speak to political issues. Even so, he said, “this is hard and complicated work” pointing to the various personalities and power structures in congregations.“A pastor is one who cares for the souls of [all] those in our care,” he said.Both men shared wisdom from their teachers, including the late William Sloane Coffin, Jr., Bishop John Spong and Walter Brueggemann.Leon, who’s preached to five presidents, said Coffin was probably the most political preacher he ever encountered. He shared some advice from one of Coffin’s preaching classes: “No souls are saved after 20 minutes, but in the Episcopal Church it’s more like 15 or 13 minutes.”That moment of levity was followed by Leon’s advice: “Preach for people. Not at them.” Then he passed on a suggestion for approaching controversial subjects: “I offer this for your consideration…” He said our task as a preacher “is to help people develop their own theological system.”One important point, Leon said, was to ask himself would he say the same thing about a politician if that person was sitting in the pew? “If not, I don’t say it,” he said. “That would be a cheap shot.”As an example, he noted a sermon on deportation. He preached on the topic as a Biblical issue, citing the numerous references in the Bible to hospitality, welcoming the stranger and the alien. Leon said he never named the politician involved in the deportation controversy.Baxter said Sutton’s pastoral letter, “One Nation Under God,” written in February, 2017, as an aid for the laity on how to listen to a preacher, is a good resource in Christian formation.Both presenters agreed that you can preach pastorally and prophetically about political issues by staying true to the gospel and true to the words and life of Jesus as messiah and Christ.And they stressed the importance of collegiality, of collaborating or checking in with colleagues when tackling tough subjects. Bishop Knudsen urged the clergy to call one another and support each other in their preaching work.Leon was emphatic that too many people are putting more faith in government than God.“I’m concerned that we are looking to government for salvation as our source of power,” he said. Leon described a conversation with the Rev. Robert Jeffress, a Southern Baptist, who preached at St. John’s at the beginning of this year’s presidential inauguration events. He said he asked Jeffress if he’d changed his profession because Leon heard him talk “more about government than the gospel.”The Rev. Adrien Dawson, rector, All Saints, Frederick, Maryland, spoke of the challenges of   preaching to a “purple” congregation, one that’s red and blue politically. She heard from the presenters it’s “important to maintain relationships [with her parishioners] at the deepest levels while also maintaining accountability to the gospel.”The Rev. Ramelle McCall, diocesan missioner to west Baltimore and priest in charge, Holy Trinity, said his takeaway was, “Being loving of those with different opinions.”The Rev. T. Stewart Lucas, rector, Nativity Holy Comforter Episcopal Lutheran Churches, said he learned “prophetic preaching is not just about words from the pulpit. It’s about relationships and building trust with those who differ from us.”The presenters were asked for last words of wisdom.“Go and preach the gospel,” said Leon.“Love your people,” urged Baxter.— The Rev. Dan Webster is a priest in the Diocese of Maryland. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Job Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Press Release Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Bath, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Jobs & Calls Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA Faith & Politics Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Smithfield, NC last_img read more