SOCCER NEWS: LAGAN HARPS U12’S LOSE OUT TO CARRICK ROVERS IN SFAI NATIONAL CUP

first_imgLagan Harps FCOur u/12’s were our only team in action over the weekend. They travelled to Monaghan to play Carrick Rovers in the National cup but lost 2-0.On the day Killian Gribben, Luke Parke, Shay Doherty and Oisin Toye were our best performers. Our mens team had no game as Kevin Kelly and Glenn Gallagher were in the Donegal League squad which defeated the Monaghan Cavan league 2-1.Next Sunday they are away to Whitestrand Utd in the Ulster Junior cup.In our weekly lotto the numbers drawn were 7,12,13 and 20. Ten people had two numbers, Alan Martin was drawn out and won E50.Our annual quiz,auctio, raffle is on this Saturday night at 8.30pm in the Mt Errigal Hotel. Concert tickets, signed autographed pictures etc. for auction or raffled on the night.All welcome.SOCCER NEWS: LAGAN HARPS U12’S LOSE OUT TO CARRICK ROVERS IN SFAI NATIONAL CUP was last modified: October 20th, 2014 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Lagan Harps FCNoticessoccerSportlast_img read more

Pregnancy Protects the Unborn from Immune Attacks

first_img(Visited 37 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 The mother’s immune system learns how to protect the embryo instead of attacking it as foreign material.The immune system is blind; it has no brain on its own.  It is programmed to identify and fight foreign substances; that it does very well.  How, then, can it identify a firstborn implanted embryo as a feature that needs protection instead of attack?  The embryo contains antigens from the father, and its own unique genetic blend, that should rouse the mother’s immune system to fight it as an invader.Specific proteins in specific immune cells are there to help.  They “learn” that pregnancy is a good thing, and they remember it when the next baby is on the way.  A paper in Nature described new findings about this elaborate process.Pregnancy is an intricately orchestrated process where immune effector cells with fetal specificity are selectively silenced. This requires the sustained expansion of immune-suppressive maternal FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg cells), because even transient partial ablation triggers fetal-specific effector T-cell activation and pregnancy loss. …. Here we show that pregnancy selectively stimulates the accumulation of maternal FOXP3+ CD4 cells with fetal specificity using tetramer-based enrichment that allows the identification of rare endogenous T cells. Interestingly, after delivery, fetal-specific Treg cells persist at elevated levels, maintain tolerance to pre-existing fetal antigen, and rapidly re-accumulate during subsequent pregnancy…. Thus, pregnancy imprints FOXP3+ CD4 cells that sustain protective regulatory memory to fetal antigen.   (Rowe et al., “Pregnancy imprints regulatory memory that sustains anergy to fetal antigen,” Nature 490, 4 Oct 2012, pp. 102–106, doi:10.1038/nature11462.)In the same issue of Nature, Alexander G. Betz described the challenge a mother’s immune system faces:Pregnancy poses a conundrum for the immune systems of placental mammals. A pregnant female’s immune system has to defend both mother and fetus from pathogens, while at the same time tolerating the fetus, which contains antigens that the maternal immune system recognizes as foreign because they are the products of genes inherited from the father. On page 102 of this issue, Rowe et al. demonstrate that, during pregnancy, immune cells called regulatory T cells that recognize these paternal antigens proliferate in the mother and specifically suppress the maternal immune response against the fetus. Furthermore, the authors show that a pool of these cells remains long after delivery, facilitating tolerance in subsequent pregnancies.  (Alexander G. Betz, “Immunology: Tolerating pregnancy,” Nature 490, 4 Oct 2012, pp. 47–48, doi:10.1038/490047a.)How did this protective system evolve?  Rowe et al. did not discuss evolution at all, but Betz offered his opinions:Genetically, a fetus is half mother, half father. From an evolutionary perspective, maternal exposure to paternal antigens in the fetus is a relatively new problem: most animals lay eggs, so tolerance is not an issue. Yet physical attachment of the developing mammalian fetus to the mother’s uterine wall by the placenta provides clear benefits — it allows gas exchange, nutrient uptake and waste disposal through the mother’s blood circulation, providing optimal conditions for the growth of the developing fetus. A systemic immune suppression to facilitate this fetal ‘implantation’ would be much too risky because it would expose the mother and developing offspring to infection. So placental animals had to evolve a mechanism for localized and specific immune suppression.One wonders how many babies had to die before evolution came up with this “mechanism,” this “intricately orchestrated process,” by chance.Over and over again we see evolutionists wasting time with stupid notions that are contrary to their own principles.  Evolution does not, and cannot, evolve something “for” something.  Evolution has no foresight, remember?  If it does anything, it recklessly damages what exists, with no care in the world, and then goes on to damage something else with chance mutations.  Whatever remains is that which was lucky enough not to die.  How many millions of embryos had to die for the Darwin lottery to keep the embryo from being destroyed by the immune system?If that were evolution’s only challenge, it would be one thing.  But pregnancy is a part of a hugely complex, interconnected system (“intricately orchestrated process”) involving three individuals: father, mother, and child.  Betz was wrong to say, “Genetically, a fetus is half mother, half father.”  No–a fetus (for humans, a baby) is its own individual being, different from both parents even though related.  If Betz were right, every child would be identical.  We all know that each baby is unique in the universe despite inheriting some clear similarities from both father and mother.  There’s no one else like you; no one else has an identical genetic makeup.How did an egg-laying animal develop a uterus in which the embryo would implant itself in the first place?  Egg laying is very different from pregnancy.  One only has to watch the documentaries on fertilization, implantation, development, and childbirth to get just a fragment of a glimpse into the numerous matching systems that all have to work perfectly together, right on time (example: David Menton’s lecture on YouTube).  Most are matters of life and death.  For instance, after relying on its mother’s placenta for 9 months, a newborn baby has to switch on its own independent breathing, with the heart sending to the lungs and liver, or it will die.  In your wildest imagination, suppose evolution got it to that point, but failed to find the lucky mutation to say, “Baby, breathe!”  How many trillions of babies died waiting for the thousands of beneficial mutations to “happen” that Darwinism requires?  Good grief; you get the point.Betz’s speculations about what mechanisms evolution came up with “for” surviving pregnancy add nothing but baloney to a great scientific paper that was doing just fine till Betz felt his inner compulsion to offer sacrifice to Charlie.  Maybe Nature asked him to do it so intelligent design would not be so obvious an inference.last_img read more

Underestimate us at your peril, Phala warns Afcon opponents

first_img8 December 2015Bafana Bafana have arrived in Gabon to continue their preparations ahead of the Africa Cup of Nations (Afcon), Africa’s most prestigious sporting event, which takes place in Equatorial Guinea from 17 January 17 to 8 February.The South Africans’ preparations for the CAF Orange Africa Cup of Nations Equatorial Guinea 2015 tournament, include a warm-up match against Cameroon on Saturday, 10 January, in Libreville.There is also another warm-up against hosts Gabon on the cards, the South African Football Association (Safa) said in a statement on Wednesday.‘Winning mentality’At a press conference ahead of the team’s departure, Safa president Danny Jordaan praised coach Shakes Mashaba for instilling a winning mentality in Bafana Bafana, KickOff magazine reported.“Previously we used to fight for draws in away matches. Shakes has changed that thinking,” Jordaan said.He said 2015 was lining up to be a very challenging year. “We currently have three teams in camp. I can’t remember the last time this happened in South Africa.“Equatorial Guinea is not the end of the road, it is the beginning of the road. We are in a group where only the best are.”Sports Minister Fikile Mbalula urged the team to make the country proud.“The players have come of age. This is a special moment for South Africa. We’re going to Afcon as competitors.“You have restored the pride and glory of the nation. If you win Afcon, it will be a glorious moment.“Go there and make South Africa proud. Our flag and national anthem will be restored among those nations.”‘Favourites’In an interview with Safa on Wednesday, Bafana Bafana winger Thuso Phala said anyone underestimating South Africa would be doing so “at their own peril”.Phala has returned to the national team, having played his last match in March last year against New Zealand in Auckland. Phala, who has been capped 14 times, scored his first international goal last Sunday, 4 January, helping Bafana Bafana to defeat Zambia.“I don’t think we can be seen as underdogs,” Phala said. “Going to the tournament most countries will be more prepared for us because perhaps they have been watching our tapes during the qualifiers … but if the other countries want to see us as underdogs, it will be to their disadvantage.“With the players we have, we booked our place in Equatorial Guinea with a game remaining,” the winger said. “I see us as one of the favourites in our group.”Phala said he believed the most difficult part of the competition was to qualify for the knockout stages. “But once you are through there, it’s anybody’s game.”He said this year the team’s focus will be on qualifying for the next round – “and then we could go all the way”.FULL BAFANA SQUADGoalkeepers: Brilliant Khuzwayo, Darren Keet, Jackson MabokgwaneDefenders: Siyabonga Nhlapo, Patrick Phungwayo, Anele Ngcongca, Thulani Hlatshwayo, Mulomowandau Mathoho, Rivaldo Coetzee, Thabo MatlabaMidfielders: Themba Zwane, Andile Jali, Reneilwe Letsholonyane, Bongani Zungu, Thamsanqa Sangweni, Dean Furman, Thuso Phala, Mandla Masango, Oupa ManyisaStrikers: Bernard Parker, Tokelo Rantie, Bongani Ndulula, Sibusiso VilakaziGROUP C FIXTURESJanuary 19 – South Africa v Algeria – Estadio de Mongomo: 9pmJanuary 23 – Senegal v South Africa – Estadio de Mongomo: 9pmJanuary 27 – Ghana v South Africa – Estadio de Mongomo: 8pmAFCON 2015 FIXTURESAll times CAT (SA, GMT+2)Saturday 17 January 2015Equatorial Guinea v Congo – Estadio de Bata: 6pmBurkina Faso v Gabon – Estadio de Bata: 9pmSunday 18 January 2015Zambia v Congo DR – Nuevo Estadio de Ebebiyin: 6pmTunisia v Cape Verde Islands – Nuevo Estadio de Ebebiyin: 9pmMonday 19 January 2015Ghana v Senegal – Estadio de Mongomo: 6pmAlgeria v South Africa – Estadio de Mongomo: 9pmTuesday 20 January 2015Cote d’Ivoire v Guinea – Nuevo Estadio de Malabo: 6pmMali v Cameroon – Nuevo Estadio de Malabo: 9pmWednesday 21 January 2015Equatorial Guinea v Burkina Faso – Estadio de Bata: 6pmThursday 22 January 2015Zambia v Tunisia – Nuevo Estadio de Ebebiyin: 6pmCape Verde Islands v Congo DR – Nuevo Estadio de Ebebiyin: 9pmFriday 23 January 2015Ghana v Algeria – Estadio de Mongomo: 6pmSouth Africa v Senegal – Estadio de Mongomo: 9pmSaturday 24 January 2015Cote d’Ivoire v Mali – Nuevo Estadio de Malabo: 6pmSunday 25 January 2015Gabon v Equatorial Guinea – Estadio de Bata: 8pmCongo v Burkina Faso – Nuevo Estadio de Ebebiyin: 8pmMonday 26 January 2015Cape Verde Islands v Zambia – Nuevo Estadio de Ebebiyin: 8pmCongo DR v Tunisia – Estadio de Bata: 8pmTuesday 27 January 2015South Africa v Ghana – Estadio de Mongomo: 8pmSenegal v Algeria – Nuevo Estadio de Malabo: 8pmWednesday 28 January 2015Guinea v Mali – Estadio de Mongomo: 8pmCameroon v Cote d’Ivoire – Nuevo Estadio de Malabo: 8pmSaturday 31 January 2015Group A Winner v Group B Second Place – Estadio de Bata: 6pmGroup B Winner v Group A Second Place – Nuevo Estadio de Ebebiyin: 9pmSunday 1 February 2015Group C Winner v Group D Second Place – Estadio de Mongomo: 6pmGroup D Winner v Group C Second Place – Nuevo Estadio de Malabo: 9pmWednesday 4 February 2015Quarterfinal 1 Winner v Quarterfinal 4 Winner – Estadio de Bata: 9pmThursday 05 February 2015Quarterfinal 2 Winner v Quarterfinal 3 Winner – Nuevo Estadio de Malabo: 9pmSaturday 07 February 2015Semifinal 1 Loser v Semifinal 2 Loser – Nuevo Estadio de Malabo: 8pmSunday 08 February 2015Semifinal 1 Winner v Semifinal 2 Winner – Estadio de Bata: 9pmSAinfo reporterlast_img read more