Burlington police chief to testify about smart law enforcement

first_img# # # # # Burlington Police Chief Michael E. Schirling will testify Wednesday before the US Senate Judiciary Committee at the invitation of Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT).  Leahy, who chairs the panel, scheduled the hearing to explore Encouraging Innovative and Cost-Effective Crime Reduction Strategies. Leahy has made state and local law enforcement issues a priority for the Judiciary Committee this Congress.  He dedicated the first hearing of the 111th Congress to examining the needs of state and local law enforcement.  In 2008, Leahy twice brought the Judiciary Committee to Vermont to hear testimony about community efforts to address crime.Chief Schirling will offer testimony about the Burlington Police Department s success in developing and enhancing community policing through partnership and problem solving.  Police departments across the country are facing cutbacks in resources and funding during difficult economic times, and are increasingly looking to local business and community organizations to help identify and implement innovative strategies to address violence and crime.The hearing will be held tomorrow, Wednesday, March 3, at 2:15 p.m., in room 226 of the Dirksen Senate Office Building in Washington.  A live webcast will be available online. Source: Leahy’s office. WASHINGTON (Tuesday, March 2)last_img read more

Windies Women crash to fourth World Cup defeat

first_imgTAUNTON, England (CMC) – West Indies’ misery at the ICC Women’s World Cup increased yesterday when they produced yet another docile performance against New Zealand Women to lose by eight wickets and crash to their fourth straight defeat.In what has become the norm during the campaign, the Caribbean side meekly surrendered for 150 all out off 43 overs after being sent in at Somerset County Ground and then watched helplessly as the Kiwis stormed to the target in the 19th over.Veteran opener Rachel Priest slammed the fastest-ever Women’s World Cup fifty en route to a stroke-filled 90 while Suzie Bates struck an unbeaten 40, to take their side to five points and fourth in the eight-team standings.West Indies, meanwhile, continued bottom without a point with virtually all hope extinguished of making the final four.Once again, their batting proved shambolic. Kyshona Knight, batting at number seven, top-scored with 42 while tail-ender Afy Fletcher finished on 23 not out and captain Stafanie Taylor and wicketkeeper Merissa Aguilleira both got 20.They were undermined by off-spinner Leigh Kasperek (3-17) and seamer Lea Tahuhu (3-39).West Indies’ promises of an improved showing came to nothing as they slumped to 10 for two in the fifth over with Tahuhu removing both openers cheaply.Left-hander Kycia Knight, who only arrived earlier this week as one of two injury replacements, had a miserable start to her campaign when she edged a low catch behind without scoring in the third over.And the in-form Hayley Matthews followed with one run added, top-edging a pull back to the bowler to depart for nine.Taylor and Chedean Nation (17) then revived the innings with a 43-run, third-wicket stand but the partnership required 71 deliveries and put the Kiwis under little pressure.The right-handed Taylor, without a significant score in the series, struck four fours in 32 balls at the crease while Nation hit three boundaries in a 43-ball knock.Kasperek returned to trap Taylor lbw, sweeping at the first delivery of a new spell and her dismissal triggered a slide where West Indies lost three wickets for no runs in the space of eight deliveries.Deandra Dottin’s horror run continued when she drove the very next delivery back to Kasperek to perish for a first-ball duck. In the next over, Nation’s vigil ended when she clipped leg-spinner Amelia Kerr to short mid-wicket where Amy Satterthwaite took a simple catch.Tottering on 53 for five in the 18th over, Kyshona Knight and Aguilleira combined in a 38-run stand to stablise the innings.The left-handed Kyshona, Kycia’s twin sister, looked composed in an innings lasting 60 deliveries and including seven fours while Aguilleira, in her 100th ODI, struck two fours and a six off 30 balls.The former skipper had just cleared the ropes at mid-wicket with Kasperek when she was unfortunately given out stumped off the next delivery even though replays showed her foot was grounded behind the line.Her dismissal signalled the end of the last bit of resistance. Shanel Daley missed a heave at off-spinner Satterthwaite and was bowled in the 33rd over for her second consecutive duck. Kyshona perished in the 40th over, bowled by pacer Holly Huddleston also missing a wild swing at 135 for eight.Fletcher struck four fours in her 37-ball innings but Anisa Mohammed (5) and Akeira Peters (0) failed to stay with her.In reply, Priest raced to her ninth half-century off a record 29 balls and all told belted 17 fours and two sixes, as she put on 120 for the first wicket with Bates who counted five fours off 43 deliveries.The right-handed Priest was in sight of her third career hundred when she picked out Daley at cover with a firm thump off off-spinner Mohammed in the 15th over.last_img read more

Prosperity ministers face new scrutiny

first_imgThe message flickered into Cindy Fleenor’s living room each night: Be faithful in how you live and how you give, the television preachers said, and God will shower you with material riches. And so the 53-year-old accountant from the Tampa, Fla., area pledged $500 a year to Joyce Meyer, the evangelist whose frank talk about recovering from childhood sexual abuse was so inspirational. She wrote checks to flamboyant faith healer Benny Hinn and a local preacher-made-good, Paula White. Only the blessings didn’t come. Fleenor ended up borrowing money from friends and payday loan companies just to buy groceries. At first she believed the explanation given on television: Her faith wasn’t strong enough. “I wanted to believe God wanted to do something great with me like he was doing with them,” she said. “I’m angry and bitter about it. Right now, I don’t watch anyone on TV hardly.” Most scholars trace the origins of prosperity theology to E.W. Kenyon, an evangelical pastor from the first half of the 20th century. But it wasn’t until the postwar era – and a pair of evangelists from Tulsa, Okla. – that “health and wealth” theology became a fixture in Pentecostal and charismatic churches. Oral Roberts and Kenneth Hagin – and later, Kenneth Copeland – trained tens of thousands of evangelists with a message that resonated with an emerging middle class, said David Edwin Harrell Jr., a Roberts biographer. Copeland is among those now being investigated. The teachings took on various names – “Name It and Claim It,” “Word of Faith,” the prosperity gospel. Prosperity preachers say that it isn’t all about money – that God’s blessings extend to health, relationships and being well-off enough to help others. Critics acknowledge the idea that God wants to bless his followers has a Biblical basis, but say prosperity preachers take verses out of context. The prosperity crowd also fails to acknowledge Biblical accounts that show God doesn’t always reward faithful believers, Palmer said. The Book of Job is a case study in piety unrewarded, and a chapter in the Book of Hebrews includes a litany of believers who were tortured and martyred, Palmer said. Yet the prosperity gospel continues to draw crowds, particularly lower- and middle-income people who, critics say, have the greatest motivation and the most to lose. The checks and balances central to Christian denominations are largely lacking in prosperity churches. One of the pastors in the Grassley probe, Bishop Eddie Long of suburban Atlanta, has written that God told him to get rid of the “ungodly governmental structure” of a deacon board. Follower borrowed cash Preachers cite Bible Some ministers hold up their own wealth as evidence that the teaching works. Atlanta-area pastor Creflo Dollar, who is fighting Grassley’s inquiry, owns a Rolls Royce and multimillion-dollar homes and travels in a church-owned Learjet. In a letter to Grassley, Dollar’s attorney calls the prosperity gospel a “deeply held religious belief” grounded in Scripture and therefore a protected religious freedom. Grassley has said his probe is not about theology. Even some prosperity gospel critics – like the Rev. Adam Hamilton of 15,000-member United Methodist Church of the Resurrection in suburban Kansas City, Mo. – say that the investigation is entering a minefield. “How do you determine how much money a minister like this is able to make when the basic theology is that wealth is OK?” said Hamilton, an Oral Roberts graduate who later left the charismatic movement. “That gets into theological questions.” 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECoach Doc Rivers a “fan” from way back of Jazz’s Jordan ClarksonAll three of the groups Fleenor supported are among six major Christian television ministries under scrutiny by a senator who is asking questions about the evangelists’ lavish spending and possible abuses of their tax-exempt status. The probe by Sen. Charles Grassley of Iowa, the ranking Republican on the Senate Finance Committee, has brought new scrutiny to the underlying belief that brings in millions of dollars and fills churches from Atlanta to Los Angeles – the “Gospel of Prosperity,” or the notion that God wants to bless the faithful with earthly riches. All six ministries under investigation preach the prosperity gospel to varying degrees. Proponents call it a biblically sound message of hope. Others say it is a distortion that makes evangelists rich and preys on the vulnerable. They say it has evolved from “it’s all right to make money” to it’s all right for the pastor to drive a Bentley, live in an oceanside home and travel by private jet. “More and more people are desperate and grasping at straws and want something that will alleviate their pain or financial crisis,” said Michael Palmer, dean of the divinity school at Regent University, founded by Pat Robertson. “It’s a growing problem.” last_img read more