Children’s flu cases turn deadly after bacterial infection

first_imgJul 11, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Health officials in Perth, Australia, last week advised parents to seek medical care quickly for young children with respiratory symptoms, after three children under age 5 died of pneumonia as a complication of “mild” influenza A infections.Paul Van Buynder, director of communicable disease control for Western Australia’s health department, said in a Jul 6 press release that officials were surprised by how quickly the illness developed in the children. “While we do not want to create unnecessary panic, it is important for parents to be aware that the disease can cause serious illness within 24 hours,” he said.The children who died had a streptococcal pneumonia infection, but health officials have not announced what type, according to a recent report from Australian Broadcasting Corporation News.The cases started out as “mild influenza A infection,” Van Buynder told the Australian Associated Press. He said the health department found no links between the children’s cases. Australia is at the peak of its flu season, and the report said hospitals in the Perth area were inundated by anxious parents bringing children with flu symptoms.News of the Australian cases comes as infectious disease and public health experts are worrying about the threat of a flu pandemic associated with H5N1 avian flu. In past flu pandemics, bacterial coinfections have contributed substantially to deaths.The Australian report also is a reminder of recent worries US health officials have had about rising numbers of young flu patients who have suffered coinfections with the sometimes-fatal Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia, in some cases involving drug-resistant strains.S aureus can cause a severe, necrotizing pneumonia that has a relatively high case-fatality rate—33% during the 1968-69 flu pandemic, the CDC said in an Apr 13 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report article that detailed some of the recent fatal cases.Evidence points to a synergistic relationship between S aureus and influenza, according to an article in the June 2006 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases. Flu viruses appear to increase S aureus adhesion in the respiratory tract, and S aureus-specific enzymes (proteases) appear to increase flu virus replication. Also, influenza A virus strains appear to decrease destruction of S aureus by immune cells called phagocytes, making patients more susceptible to bacterial coinfection.In May the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued an alert after noticing an increase in the number of S aureus infections in children with flu. The CDC said that from October 2006 through early May, 55 influenza deaths in children had been reported. Twenty of the children (out of 51 for whom relevant data were available) had bacterial infections, and 16 of these were infected with S aureus.Though the number of pediatric flu deaths this past flu season was similar to the two previous years, the CDC said the 16 deaths from S aureus pneumonia or bacteremia recorded so far reflected a sharp increase over those years. Only one S aureus coinfection was identified during the 2004-05 season, followed by three in 2005-06.Further, of the 16 children who had S aureus infections, 11 had methicillin-resistant (MRSA) strains that are typically associated with MRSA skin infection outbreaks, the CDC advisory said.The CDC also noted that the children who had S aureus infections had been in good health before they got sick, but progressed rapidly to serious illness.Anthony Fiore, MD, a medical epidemiologist with the CDC, told CIDRAP News that because childhood flu deaths have been nationally notifiable only since 2004, it’s difficult to make definitive statements about pneumonia death patterns. “It is concerning, and there is a surge in awareness, particularly with the antibiotic resistant strains of Staphylococcus,” he said.The CDC has other ways to track pneumonia trends in children with influenza, he said. For example, the Emerging Infections Program and the New Vaccine Surveillance Network are two systems that can capture clusters of severe infections in children that lead to hospitalization.Edward Septimus, MD, an infectious disease expert who is medical director of clinical integration at Methodist Hospital in Houston, told CIDRAP News that the clinical picture of the Australian cases possibly suggests a Group A Streptococcus organism. “It’s a severe clinical picture and it can act a lot like MRSA. The necrotizing effects are very similar,” he said. Jim Henson, the creator of the Muppets, died of a Group A streptococcal pneumonia, Septimus added.He said that without more information, it’s difficult to predict whether the Australian cases point to any troubling trends. Sometimes, he commented, patients are simply unlucky: Their risk of developing a serious pneumonia rises if they are colonized with a bacterial organism such as MRSA or Streptococcus when influenza viruses are circulating.See also:Western Australia Department of Health news releasehttp://www.health.wa.gov.au/press/view_press.cfm?id=711May 9 CDC health advisoryCDC. Severe methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus community-acquired pneumonia associated with influenza—Louisiana and Georgia, December 2006-January 2007. MMWR 2007;56(14):325-29 [Full text]Hageman JC, Uyeki TM, Francis JS, et al. Severe community-acquired pneumonia due to Staphyococcus aureus, 2003-04 influenza season. Emerg Infect Dis 2006 Jun;12(6):894-99 [Full text]last_img read more

Bengals owner wants Andy Dalton to prove himself before offering extension

first_img“I think it’s a good year for (Dalton) to show like he can, like we think he will,” Brown told Cincinnati.com. “After he re-establishes himself we would want to get together with him and see if we can extend it. “I think Andy is a good player and that he will rebound off last year. He was hurt. We lost so many other pieces. It fell apart, but if he’s healthy and we stay healthy enough, I have confidence in him.” The Bengals should be improved on offense this season, with new head coach Zac Taylor known for his offensive schemes. Taylor expressed confidence in Dalton this week.“He can handle everything,” Taylor said, via Bengals.com. “He can handle everything you want to do at the line of scrimmage, which is key. He can make all the protection calls, understands what we’re looking for in the run game. Andy is great in that regard. He’s got a high football IQ, he’ll be able to handle anything they throw at him.” The team is also eager for the return of A.J. Green, who missed seven games in 2018 with an injured toe. Green’s contract expires after 2019, but Brown said he is confident the team can reach a deal to extend the seven-time Pro Bowl wideout.”The price range for him will be something we can figure out, will come together,” Brown said. Bengals owner Mike Brown told reporters this week the team doesn’t plan to offer quarterback Andy Dalton a contract extension before the 2019 season.Instead, Brown is waiting to see if the 31-year-old veteran “re-establishes himself” this season. Dalton is under contract through 2020. Dalton, the Bengals’ second-round pick in the 2011 draft, started his first game as a rookie and has held the position ever since. He had 21 touchdowns, 11 interceptions and averaged 233 yards passing last season, but missed the final five games with a thumb injury. A three-time Pro Bowl selection, Dalton is young enough to bounce back. That’s what Brown hopes to see. Related News Johnny Manziel leaves AAF game with head injury after tackle attemptlast_img read more

Get along to Culture Night across Donegal tonight!

first_imgIt’s Culture Night and hundreds of thousands of people across Ireland will be experiencing an explosion of creativity this evening as the country comes alive for Culture Night, Ireland’s annual nocturnal cultural extravaganza.With over 50 diverse events in 27 venues in Letterkenny alone this is a terrific opportunity for families to enjoy a totally unique evening of accessible, family friendly events and all completely free of charge.There is something for everyone to enjoy from generations of families experiencing new night-time adventures to groups of friends enjoying cultural genres they might never have before”.  Some of the highlights:Cybertribe in the Letterkenny Town Park and is a night time extravaganza of sculpture, performance and art installation is inspired by comic book visions of the future and real-life emerging cyber technologies.Guided tours at Letterkenny Courthouse along with a very special reading from the 2019 Culture Night ambassador poet Annemarie Ní Churreáin.Film and Exhibitions Selection of exhibitions at the Donegal County Museum including the Letterkenny Folk Festival featuring photographs, posters and leaflets from the collections of Sally Blake and Billy Watson to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the festival.  And ‘All Aboard the Donegal Railways!’ where visitors can also watch footage from the heyday of the trains and share memories of the railways of Donegal.Regional Cultural Centre is offering something special for all ages and interests with visual art, film and family workshops including ‘When I Was a Child’, a group exhibition curated by Peadar Mc Daid, featuring 50 artists presenting work that reflects something from their childhood.Over at Century Cinemas the Donegal Intercultural Platform, Donegal Travellers Project, Building Intercultural Communities (BIC) presents the launch of the Donegal Intercultural Arts Research Project Report and the screening of Garry Keane and Andrew McConnell’s film Gaza and Sai Sankar’s, Sakura Pooka, followed by Q&A with guest speakers.Children and Families The Central Library presents a fantastic programme of history and heritage with exhibitions, tours and the Jessica Harkin Family Magic Show kicking off proceedings. Something a little bit different..! An Grianán Theatre presents Waiting Tables For Godot, by Mockingbird Theatre Group with Ronan Carr and Anne Gallagher.  Performed in the theatre’s cafe bar with soup served in bowler hats for the customers, this show is about a pair of conjoined twins who are serving tables and waiting for Godot to come through the front door.The nearby Bus Éireann Bus Station presents a Donegal County Museum offsite exhibition as well as unique performance with Little John Nee who is Waiting On a Train. In this special Culture Night event he will present a series of songs and spoken word interludes on a theme of trains and railways.Get along to Culture Night across Donegal tonight! was last modified: September 20th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Ohio’s National Agriscience Fair results

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Ohio also had a solid showing in the National Agriscience Fair.Holly Schmenk, Patrick Henry, was first place in Food Products and Processing Systems Division 1.Kolbie Brandenburg and Abigail Fulton, Felicity-Franklin, were second in Animal Systems Division 3.Grace Lach, Bloom Carroll, was third in Plant Systems Division 1Jarrett Crowthers and Jenna Jackels, Edgewood-Butler Tech, were third in Plant Systems Division 3Rebecca Helt, Global Impact STEM Academy of Ohio FFA Association, was third in Social Systems Division 2.last_img read more