India to benefit from China solar reforms

first_imgIndia to benefit from China solar reforms FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Bloomberg:India may be the biggest beneficiary of solar industry reforms in China that are poised to reduce prices for photovoltaic panels.China announced last week it was halting approvals of some new solar projects this year and cutting subsidies to developers to ease its pace of expansion. That’s expected to slow demand in the world’s biggest market, weakening prices, and force the country’s manufacturers to ship more panels overseas.Tariffs in India’s next solar auction scheduled for mid-June may fall below the 2.44 rupees per kilowatt hour record set May 17 last year, said Sanjay Sharma, general manager at Solar Energy Corp. of India, the agency responsible for implementing India’s renewable targets.“India will be a big beneficiary of a fall in module prices,” said Vinay Rustagi, managing director at solar research firm Bridge to India. “If China’s demand weakens as expected, module prices should come down dramatically in the second half of the year and into the next.”India is seeking to boost its clean energy generation as Prime Minister Narendra Modi has pledged to double India’s renewable power capacity to 175 gigawatts by 2022, a target second only to China, as part of his plan to spearhead global efforts to combat climate change.India’s maximum annual solar-cell manufacturing capacity is about 3 gigawatts while average yearly demand is 20 gigawatts, meaning the remainder needs to be procured on the international market, according to a December statement from India’s Ministry of New & Renewable Energy.More: India sees record low solar prices returning on China reformslast_img read more

WHO: H5N1 strikes two more Indonesians

first_imgFeb 5, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – The World Health Organization (WHO) today confirmed that a 29-year-old Indonesian woman recently died of H5N1 avian influenza and that another Indonesian, a 38-year-old woman, is hospitalized with the disease.The 29-year-old woman was from Tangerang, the same western suburb of Jakarta where several of Indonesia’s most recent H5N1 case-patients lived. She fell ill on Jan 22, was hospitalized 6 days later, and died on Feb 2, according to a WHO statement. She is listed as the country’s 125th case-patient and its 103rd fatality.The WHO said an investigation into the source of her illness was under way. Lili Sulistyowati, a spokeswoman from Indonesia’s health ministry, said the woman’s neighbors raised chickens, but it’s not known if the birds were infected with the H5N1 virus, according to a report yesterday from Xinhua, China’s state news agency.The WHO also announced that the 38-year-old woman, who is from West Jakarta, is in critical condition. She became ill Jan 24 and was hospitalized 2 days later. She is now confirmed as Indonesia’s 126th H5N1 case-patient, according to the WHO.The source of the woman’s illness is also still under investigation, the WHO said. Sulistyowati told Xinhua that a week ago the woman visited her parents, who live next to a family that raises ducks.Indonesia has been hit hardest of any country by the H5N1 virus. The WHO’s global H5N1 count stands at 359 cases and 226 deaths.See also:Feb 5 WHO statementlast_img read more

Analyst dream team quits CSFB for rival

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Westhill girls lacrosse tops Marcellus, 10-8

first_img Tags: girls lacrosseMarcellusWesthill But though Vetsch had five goals and Canny added three goals, no other Mustangs player helped them, and Westhill, with more options, fought their way in front during the second half.True, Rebecca Gilhooley had three goals and three assists, but aid came from Caroline Miller and Gianna Zerrillo, who each scored twice. Also, Reilly Geer, Grace Winkler and Kendra MacCaull earned goals, negating the nine saves from Marcellus goalie Kenai Cameron.A day earlier, neither team had much stress as Westhill went to Tully and prevailed 14-5 over the Black Knights, while Marcellus dominated Jordan-Elbridge in a 19-2 decision. Not wasting much time, Marcellus steadily built a 13-1 halftime advantage on J-E and just kept going, Katy Wangnsess leading the way with five goals as Vetsch got three goals and three assists.Canny also scored three times, adding two assists as Sarah Hutchings had two goals and one assist. Casey Conklin got a goal and two assists, with Lily Locastro, Madison Green, Maisie Moses, Madeline Caron and Elena Shaw also converting.Gabby Smart and Chelsea Curtis earned J-E’s lone goals, and Gabby Skotinski was busy in the net for the Eagles, finishing the night with 12 saves.Earlier that day, Westhill had a rare game on a natural-grass surface, but still took control against Tully late in the first half, building an 8-2 advantage on the Black Knights.And the Warriors protected that lead well, with three-goal hat tricks from four different players –Gilhooley, Winkler, Zerrillo and MacCaull.  Gilhooley also had five assists, with Miller getting three assists and Winkler two assists. Franny Argentieri stopped nine of the 14 shots she faced.Share this:FacebookTwitterLinkedInRedditComment on this Story center_img With the Westhill girls lacrosse team planted at no. 2 in the state Class D rankings and Marcellus still in the no. 6 spot, a whole lot of importance was attached to Wednesday night’s meeting besides the natural rivalry the two schools share.Knowing that they might meet each other for higher stakes later in the month, the Mustangs got the best part of the early going, but later on it was the Warriors, strong on both ends, able to take charge and pull out a 10-8 victory.As it turned out, the Mustangs were a two-player attack. Anna Vetsch and Laura Canny were responsible for every single goal during an active first half, and their work was enough to inch Marcellus in front 6-5 going to the break.last_img read more

Camp Notes: Airon Servais discusses concern over myocarditis, Liberty game

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on August 19, 2020 at 3:27 pm Contact Adam: adhillma@syr.edu | @_adamhillman “When you play football, there’s huge risks every time you step on the field no matter what,” Syracuse tight end Luke Benson said. “With the virus, it doesn’t stop or get any worse for anybody on the football field and it doesn’t pick and choose or have bias.”Both Benson and Servais expressed their concern for the Oct. 17 matchup against Liberty. No players at the school had been tested for two weeks because none were symptomatic, The News & Advance reported Aug. 15. Up to 40% of people who’ve contracted COVID-19 don’t show any symptoms, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.SU Director of Athletics John Wildhack told ESPN that the report about Liberty was “deeply troubling.” With the matchup a little over two months away, both Servais and Benson mentioned that sitting out against Liberty is a possibility but a decision wouldn’t be made until the week of the game.“If we don’t feel that our opponent has done what they need to do in order to ensure other team’s safety, it could end up that we don’t play that game,” Servais said. “I’m not the head man so I don’t make that decision, but I know we’ve discussed it as a team. If Coach Babers doesn’t feel that his guys aren’t going to be put in a safe situation, then he won’t put us in that situation.”For now, Servais is happy with SU’s response to the players sitting out practice last week and what other ACC schools are doing. Syracuse upped its testing to once per week during the preseason and three times per week during the regular season. SU’s opponents will do the same, Servais said. But playing a football season in a non-bubble environment will pose difficulties, as seen at North Carolina and Notre Dame in the past week. Both schools saw outbreaks as non-athletes returned to campus, and both have now pivoted toward online classes. Syracuse students are in the process of returning to campus, and in-person classes start Aug. 24. Servais is hoping that the cases at UNC and Notre Dame are a warning sign to his peers: if you don’t comply with public health guidelines, the semester, and perhaps Syracuse’s season, won’t last long. “As a university at Syracuse, we can take examples like that and use it as a learning example to show people that there is a certain way to do things and that if you don’t follow those guidelines, you can get sent home,” Servais said.The Daily Orange is a nonprofit newsroom that receives no funding from Syracuse University. Consider donating today to support our mission. Comments The Daily Orange is a nonprofit newsroom that receives no funding from Syracuse University. Consider donating today to support our mission.The media won’t have access to Syracuse’s training camp practices this year due to the coronavirus pandemic. Instead, the football team is organizing regular Zoom interviews with head coach Dino Babers and select players while also providing film from the Ensley Athletic Center. With “Camp Notes,” The Daily Orange’s beat reporters bring the latest news, observations and analysis as the Orange gear up for an unprecedented 2020 season. Follow along here and on Twitter.Airon Servais was curious when he first learned of myocarditis, a potential side effect of the coronavirus that affects the heart. Multiple Big Ten players, as well as Boston Red Sox pitcher Eduardo Rodriguez, had been diagnosed with the rare condition after recovering from COVID-19. The condition is linked to long-term fatigue, shortness of breath and abnormal heart rhythm. As a justification for postponing the season, the Big Ten cited a study that showed that, in a 100-person population with COVID-19 infections and a median age of 49, 78% had either cardiac inflammation or scarring, or both. Athletes, like Orlando Magic center Mo Bamba, haven’t been able to return to playing shape post-diagnosis. Servais asked himself how myocarditis would impact his life, not even considering football. Before opting into the season, he talked to a few cardiologists.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“After having conversations like that, I feel a lot more comfortable moving forward,” Servais said. Some doctors have talked down the impact of myocarditis on individuals between the ages of 18 and 24. Michael Ackerman, a genetic cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic and a consultant to the Big 12, told The Athletic that the heart condition shouldn’t be the sole reason to cancel a season.last_img read more