Football: Manchester United in for Croatian winger Ante Rebic

first_imgAdvertisement AdvertisementPhoto Credits: Getty ImagesManchester United boss Jose Mourinho has previously stated that he is willing to add two more players to his squad.The 24-year-old winger Ante Rebic impressed critics through his performance in the 2018 FIFA World Cup and played a key role in Croatia reaching the finals.It looks like Old Trafford have shifted their focus towards Ante Rebic after not being able to acquire Rebic’s Croatian team-mate Ivan Perisic from Inter Milan.Rebic is an industrious player with a high work rate and immense shot power. He has an adaptable and fluid playing style that makes him a versatile footballer.The Croatian international currently plays for German club Eintracht Frankfurt where he scored 8 goals in 49 appearances.Read also: Football: Some facts to know about Barcelona’s latest signing – Malcomlast_img read more

UDC Stages Fireworks on the Kingston Waterfront and in Ocho Rios

first_imgStory Highlights “Last year, we extended the event to Ocho Rios through our subsidiary company, the St. Ann Development Company. So this year, we will again be doing two events with the St. Ann event being dubbed, ‘Fireworks on the Bay’, at the Ocho Rios Bay,” said Director of Corporate Communications at the Urban Development Corporation (UDC), Lorna Clarke, at a JIS ‘Think Tank’, on December 27. The Kingston Waterfront will come alive on New Year’s Eve with the 17th staging of the Urban Development Corporation’s ‘Fireworks on the Waterfront’, under the theme ‘Feel the Magic, Be the GLOW’.The event, which is the “the largest family-oriented event that takes place anywhere in Jamaica”, will once again branch out to include the northern half of the island.“Last year, we extended the event to Ocho Rios through our subsidiary company, the St. Ann Development Company. So this year, we will again be doing two events with the St. Ann event being dubbed, ‘Fireworks on the Bay’, at the Ocho Rios Bay,” said Director of Corporate Communications at the Urban Development Corporation (UDC), Lorna Clarke, at a JIS ‘Think Tank’, on December 27.The St. Ann and Kingston Fireworks will begin at 2:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m., respectively, and will include a kiddie’s village, a vending village, an early show and a main stage event, which will culminate with fireworks at midnight.The main stage event will feature artistes, such as Agent Sasco, Bugle and Kevin Downswell in Kingston, and Ernie Smith and Devin di Doctor in Ocho Rios.Fireworks on the Waterfront will include two new additions this year – a second VIP package (VIP Sky), and a park-and-ride service with the Jamaica Urban Transit Company (JUTC).“We have included VIP Sky at Victoria Pier, which is up and running and in our event space. So, there are two experiences that will be had — Front Row, up close to the stage; and VIP Sky. You will still be able to see the stage but the view of the fireworks will be spectacular from the deck,” Ms. Clarke said.Both VIP sections will serve hors d’oeuvres and complimentary drinks. Tickets for these areas are: Adults, $7,000; couples, $12,000, and children $3,000 for VIP Front Row; and Adults, $8,500; couples, $15,000, and children $4,000 for VIP Sky. These can be purchased at the UDC Head Office on Ocean Boulevard in downtown Kingston.“We have provided satellite parking areas at the National Heroes Circle and Garmex, if you are coming from Portmore; and Bellevue, if you are coming from the East. You’ll pay $300 to park in those areas, and the shuttle (to the Waterfront) is free. That service is ongoing from the start of the event until the end, so there is no fear that when you are ready to leave, you are not going to get back to your car,” Ms. Clarke said.Private security will be provided at all designated parking areas, and the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) is on board for security at the Fireworks event.The  Fireworks on the Waterfront Kingston event is sponsored by CHASE Fund; Ministry of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport; Tourism Enhancement Fund (TEF); Digicel; Jamaica Properties/Pan Jamaican Investment Trust; Airports Authority of Jamaica; Jamaica Freight & Shipping; GraceKennedy Limited; Main Event Entertainment Group; Pepsi Jamaica; National Commercial Bank (NCB) and Television Jamaica. The event, which is the “the largest family-oriented event that takes place anywhere in Jamaica”, will once again branch out to include the northern half of the island. The Kingston Waterfront will come alive on New Year’s Eve with the 17th staging of the Urban Development Corporation’s ‘Fireworks on the Waterfront’, under the theme ‘Feel the Magic, Be the GLOW’.last_img read more

Two Conservative riding associations return event proceeds to donors

first_imgOTTAWA — A pair of Conservative campaigns that were forced to refund the proceeds from two separate fundraising events earlier this year say Canada’s new political financing law should not be applied retroactively.Two Ontario riding associations returned proceeds from the January events — one attended by Conservative deputy leader Lisa Raitt in Mississauga—Streetsville, the other featuring foreign affairs critic Erin O’Toole in his Durham riding.Because of loose ends arising from their bids for the Conservative leadership in 2017, Raitt and O’Toole were still considered leadership candidates at the time of the fundraisers, under Elections Canada’s interpretation of Bill C-50, which took effect in December.That law, introduced last summer by Electoral Reform Minister Karina Gould, requires events that feature a prominent attendee — a leadership contestant, a party leader, an interim leader, or a cabinet minister — to be reported to Elections Canada, which the riding associations did not do.O’Toole, who was forced to return about $30,000 from what was his largest riding association event of the year, said he disagrees with Elections Canada’s interpretation, which he didn’t learn about until several weeks after his fundraiser.The forgone proceeds, combined with how long it took to find out Elections Canada was applying the law retroactively, was “quite frustrating” and “not great form,” O’Toole said in an email.There’s nothing in the bill to suggest it would apply to candidates from races that were completed before the bill came into force last year, he added.“From a legal perspective, all legislation is prospective — going forward in time only — unless there is express government intention to apply the new rules to past events,” O’Toole said.“There was no such intention when Minister Gould introduced the bill.”But O’Toole said he ultimately decided he did not want to engage in a dispute with Elections Canada and was as transparent as possible throughout the process. He said he proactively told Elections Canada about his event when he learned how they were applying the law.David Bishop, president of the Mississauga-Streetsville electoral district association, echoed O’Toole’s frustration.“No EDA would want to put themselves in a position that costs them time and money ahead of an election,” Bishop said, “but we have strived to be completely transparent and to work with Elections Canada as soon as we learned of their view.”Bishop did not disclose how much the event raised.A spokesperson for Elections Canada said the chief electoral officer, Stephane Perrault, “recognizes the challenge posed by the application of the C-50 rules once leadership contests are over.”Natasha Gauthier said Perrault was going to make a recommendation in a report after the election “to address this situation,” and it would be up to Parliament to change the rules around reporting.The event featuring O’Toole was held Jan. 17 at the Albany Club in Toronto, while the Mississauga-Streetsville event Raitt attended took place Jan. 21.The event attended by Raitt was attended by 18 people and required at least one person to pay $250 to attend, according to Elections Canada documents. O’Toole’s event was attended by 46 people, and required at least one person to pay $500 to attend. It’s not clear whether all attendees for the events paid the amount listed in the documents.Christian Paas-Lang, The Canadian Presslast_img read more