TVA Closes Its Last Coal-Fired Plant

first_imgTVA Closes Its Last Coal-Fired Plant FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Lauren Bellero for SNL:The Tennessee Valley Authority has taken its Colbert fossil plant off line, marking the end of a 61-year run. The utility removed unit one from service March 23 at the 1,209 MW coal-fired power plant in Colbert County, Ala.Colbert, the last of the utility’s operating coal-fired plants in Alabama, was scheduled to be retired by April 15, the utility said. The Widow’s Creek coal-fired power plant, located in Jackson County, Ala., was taken offline in September 2015, according to S&P Global Market Intelligence data.TVA President and CEO Bill Johnson said during the TVA’s Feb. 3 earnings call that the plant’s closure is part of the retirement of more than 7,000-MW of coal-fired generation. Nuclear power, gas-fired power, renewables and energy efficiency are being used to replace the capacity. The TVA plans to generate more than half of its energy from “non-emitting sources” by 2020.Full article ($): TVA retires last operating unit at Colbert coal plantlast_img read more

Gazprom and Almaz-Antey Seal Subsea Equipment Deal

first_imgGazprom and Almaz-Antey Corporation have signed a contract for batch manufacturing of subsea production equipment.The deal was signed by Alexey Miller, chairman of the Gazprom management committee, and Yan Novikov, chairman of the management board, director general of the Almaz-Antey Corporation, at the Russian Investment Forum in SochiAccording to the document, the Corporation will set up the batch manufacturing and supply of subsea hydrocarbon production systems for Gazprom, as well as provide maintenance and repair services for the aforementioned equipment.The ongoing cooperation with the Almaz-Antey Corporation is part of the continuous efforts spearheaded by the Ministry of Industry and Trade of the Russian Federation and Gazprom with a view to developing domestic subsea production systems.last_img read more

CDC Bans Cruises in U.S. Waters Until October, Due to Outbreaks

first_imgIf you were hoping to set sail in the coming months, you could be out of luck.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced Thursday that it has banned cruising in U.S. waters until at least Oct. 1, due to the COVID-19 pandemic.The agency extended its no-sail order for cruises, which was set to expire July 24, for the second time in recent months, amid continued virus outbreaks on cruise ships.Companies that are members of the cruise industry lobbying group Cruise Lines International Association, including Carnival Corp., Royal Caribbean Group, Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings, MSC Cruises, Disney Cruise Line and Virgin Voyages, had already cancelled all of their sailings through at least Sept. 14.Meanwhile, Bahamas Paradise Cruise Line had cancelled its cruises through Aug. 28.Looking back at past adventures always brightens our day. What are some of your favorite vacay memories? Share your #TBT pics with us in the thread.: Erik C. pic.twitter.com/IXAh6oqdkc— Royal Caribbean (@RoyalCaribbean) July 16, 2020 Although the last cruise passengers disembarked in early June, thousands of crew members are still awaiting repatriation without pay.In addition, some crew members are still contracting COVID-19 on board.Since March 1, cruise companies have reported a total of 2,973 COVID-19 or COVID-like illnesses to the CDC on cruise ships in U.S. waters and 34 COVID-19 deaths, according to the agency.About 1,000 of those confirmed and suspected cases, and one of the deaths – a crew member on the Disney’s “Wonder” ship – have occurred since June 23, according to records.The CDC clarified that the confirmed and suspected cases were part of 99 outbreaks on 123 different cruise ships.According to U.S. Coast Guard data, there are 67 ships in and around U.S. waters, with 14,702 crew members onboard, as of July 10.last_img read more