Different Virus Responses – The New York Times

first_imgWant to get The Morning by email? Here’s the sign-up.Good morning. The U.S. and Europe are responding to the latest virus waves differently, and one approach is working better than the other. Make pan-seared gyoza — Japanese dumplings filled with ground pork, cabbage, chives, ginger and garlic.What to Listen to15 new tracks by Foo Fighters, Shania Twain, Billie Eilish and more.Fine ArtA new building at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston showcases works by Latin American and Latino artists who are rarely shown in the U.S. (In Opinion, Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, a Republican former member of Congress, and Ken Salazar, Barack Obama’s former interior secretary, argue that the country should create a museum honoring American Latino history and culture on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.) “I’m sure the Europeans didn’t want to restrict their activities any more than we do,” Janet Baseman, an epidemiologist at the University of Washington, told me over the weekend. “Everyone is tired and ready for this to end, but we have to accept the reality of the data before us.”Many Americans have resisted accepting that reality. Across much of the country, restaurants remain open for indoor dining. Last week, New York State announced a new policy that public health experts consider to be a bizarre middle ground: Businesses with a liquor license can stay open until 10 p.m.- Advertisement – As you can see, both the U.S. and Europe have been coping with severe outbreaks, with caseloads rising even faster in much of Europe than in the U.S. during much of this fall. But over the past two weeks, France, Germany, Spain and Britain have managed to reduce their growth rates.- Advertisement – What is Europe doing differently? It is cracking down on the kind of indoor gatherings that most commonly spread the virus. England closed pubs, restaurants, gyms and more on Nov. 5 and announced they would remain closed until at least Dec. 2. France, Germany’s regional governments and the Catalonia region of Spain have also shut restaurants, among other businesses. Morning ReadsTrilobites: Platypuses glow under black light. Scientists have no idea why.Lives Lived: Lee Hyo-jae championed women’s rights and democracy in South Korea, helping abolish the country’s patriarchal naming system and standing up to its military dictatorship in the 1980s. She died at 95.Subscribers make our reporting possible, so we can help you make sense of the moment. If you’re not a subscriber, please consider becoming one today. The European approach seems to be working better.Look at this chart, which shows the number of new daily virus cases in five countries, adjusted for population size:center_img And the virus is now spreading so rapidly in the U.S. that keeping schools open does pose risks, including the chance that teachers, janitors and other workers infect one another. To keep schools open in a safe way, the U.S. would probably first need to close other public places. Only a few states — including Michigan, Oregon, New Mexico and Washington — have closed indoor dining recently.“The U.S. case and hospitalization numbers we’re seeing right now are chilling,” Baseman said.But if there are no perfect solutions to the pandemic, there are better and worse ones. Right now, the U.S. seems to be falling well short of what’s possible.THE LATEST NEWSThe Virus – Advertisement – At last, Princess Diana entersSince Netflix’s “The Crown” began airing in 2016, fans have excitedly anticipated Princess Diana’s character. This weekend, she arrived, in the first episode of the show’s fourth season.It covers Diana from age 16 to 28, starting in the late 1970s. Emma Corrin, in her first prominent role, is playing the part. Sarah Lyall, a former London correspondent for The Times, writes that Corrin nails “the princess’s seductive signature gesture — head tilting to the side, eyes glancing coquettishly upward through her bangs.”The portrayal is based on interviews, news media accounts and a tell-all 1992 biography by Andrew Morton. Diana made revisions to the manuscript in her own handwriting and personally approved every page, Morton has said.One new challenge for this show: A large part of its audience will have lived through the events it’s depicting, like Diana’s wedding to Prince Charles and Margaret Thatcher’s tenure as prime minister. Can the show still feel like the escape that the first three seasons were? “As always, they have taken many cinematic liberties,” Sarah writes. “‘Crown’ watchers in Britain are already debating what is accurate and what has been changed for dramatic purposes.”PLAY, WATCH, EATWhat to Cook The one indoor activity that appears to present less risk is school, especially elementary school. Why? Young children seem to spread the virus less often than adults do. “Research has shown that if you put social-distancing protocols in place, school is actually quite a safe environment,” Andreas Schleicher, who studies schools for the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development in Paris, told NPR.Closing schools and switching entirely to remote learning, on the other hand, has big social costs. Children are learning less, and many parents, mostly mothers, have dropped out of the labor force. The U.S. is suffering from both of these problems and from a raging pandemic.There are no easy answers, to be sure. Closing restaurants and other businesses creates economic hardship (which some European countries are trying to reduce through government aid). As the coronavirus has surged again in recent weeks, much of the United States has chosen to keep restaurants open and schools closed. Much of Europe has done the opposite.- Advertisement –last_img read more

Stabbing lands cop in hospital

first_imgBut the motive in the incident was not immediately established. BACOLOD City – A cop was stabbed in Barangay Talubangi, Kabankalan City, Negros Occidental.Staff Sergeant John Perez, 54, of Barangay 1, Kabankalan City sustained stabbed wounds on the body, police said. Perez was brought to the Lorenzo D. Zayco District Hospital in Kabankalan City and is now in stable condition.Bautista, meanwhile, was detained in the lockup facility of the Kabankalan City police station, facing charges./PN Resident Noel Bautista, 33, was tagged suspect, the police added. According to police investigators, Perez was on duty in the area when he was stabbed by Bautista using a broken beer bottle around 9:30 a.m. on May 11.last_img read more

Batesville School Board approves high school courses for 17-18 school year

first_imgBATESVILLE, Ind. — The Batesville School board approved the High School curriculum and course guide for the 2017-2018 school year.Mr. Andy Allen, High School Principal, said some of these courses would also be available at Ivy Tech in Batesville.One change for the high school is in the Physical Education curriculum.For advanced PE, there would be different options including weight lifting and lifetime fitness.In other business, the school was approached by the Ripley County EMA to approve an agreement to share resources with the county in the event of a natural or manmade disaster.Tim Hunter said, in such an event, the old gymnasium would be used, which would allow the school’s normal day-to-day operations to continue.The school board approved the request.last_img read more

Dyche desperate to strengthen squad

first_img “The only over-lying marker that usually gets any deal done is money, we all know that. We will put good resources into certain areas and certain deals, but there is a limit. “The club’s future is important, not just the immediate future on the pitch.” Burnley are arguably bigger outsiders than they were when they reached the Premier League for the first time in 2009, a stay that lasted only one season. They begin their campaign by welcoming Chelsea to Turf Moor a week on Monday, allowing ‘the Ginger Mourinho’ to pit his wits against the real thing. Dyche knows his team will be written off before they have started but he is confident they have the right formula to surprise people. “We were underdogs last year and I think we got used to that,” said the 43-year-old former defender. “It can bring freedom. There’ll be an expectation from us, how we perform and how we go about it, but from the outside arguably we’ll be deemed probably one of the biggest underdogs there’s been in the Premier League for a while. “But we do know the underdog story. There’s not many, if you actually analyse underdog stories, that are by chance or luck. “So at the same time as being an underdog, we like to think there’s a way we go about our business that will give us a chance to do well and be competitive and win football matches.” Sean Dyche estimates he has made 500 phone calls this summer as he attempts to create a squad capable of staying in the Barclays Premier League. Dyche, who refused to comment on reports linking the club with Nottingham Forest midfielder Henri Lansbury, said: ” It’s a challenge. “Some of it is intriguing to know what’s out there, what we can do and what we can’t do, and it’s annoying sometimes because there’s things you want to get pushed through and they drag and drag and drag, and we’ve had that on a few different situations. “We work hard. I reckon I’ve made 500 phone calls over the summer to managers to agents to coaches, background on players etc. And that’s just me, that’s not counting my staff, the recruitment side of things. “We keep looking and we keep searching for the ones that are appropriate and that can help us to enhance our chances of doing well this year. “We need more strength in depth but that doesn’t just come with anyone, we have to also make sure there’s some quality and talent there otherwise it would be counter productive. “There’s not a definitive number. I doubt we’ll hit 25 senior players, but we definitely want to enhance the numbers. “If we had the finance we’re spending now in the Championship, that would give us a real competitive edge. In the Premier League, we all know what it’s like. The numbers are vast, e ven for players who you wouldn’t recognise as being market leaders, but they move for very big fees and very big wages. “You could get frustrated by it but what’s the point? That’s not going to get any deals done. Press Association Dyche led Burnley to promotion from the Sky Bet Championship in May despite the Clarets having one of the smallest squads in the second tier. He has so far added goalkeeper Matt Gilks, midfielders Steven Reid, Matt Taylor and Michael Kightly and forwards Lukas Jutkiewicz and Marvin Sordell, but hopes to boost the numbers further before the end of the month. last_img read more

Worth County woman loses appeals in animal neglect case

first_imgMANLY — A Worth County woman found guilty of animal neglect has lost an appeal of her case. 67-year-old Barbara Kavars of Manly in October was convicted by a Worth County jury of 14 counts of animal neglect in connection with the operation of a puppy mill and was sentenced to two years probation, a suspended jail sentence and $910 in fines. Prosecutors said at the time that Kavars was holding dogs in inhumane conditions when officials raided her operation on November 12, 2018, and seized about 150 dogs. Officials said the dogs’ kennels lacked food and had water containers filled with ice. 17 dogs had fur matted by feces, skin conditions leading to fur loss, painful wounds, intestinal parasites and other maladies. One dog had to be euthanized. Kavars and her attorney filed petitions back in January requesting a new trial and to overturn a civil ruling from January of last year that dogs and cats seized from her property were “threatened animals”. District Judge Colleen Weiland recently ruled that Kavars had not provided substantial evidence that her conviction was unjust or that her sentence was too harsh. Judge Douglas Krull ruled against Kavars in the civil case, saying there was overwhelming evidence of neglect.last_img read more