Lampard could face West Ham

first_imgFrank Lampard has an outside chance of recovering from injury ahead of Manchester City’s visit to another of his old clubs West Ham on Saturday. Press Association Meanwhile, it has emerged that Manchester City’s new state-of-the-art training centre could be used by Lampard’s club New York City FC for a pre-season camp in January. That could benefit City by allowing the midfielder to extend his loan spell at the Etihad deeper in to the new year than was first envisaged. The new MLS franchise is part-owned by City’s owner Sheikh Mansour and the new Etihad Campus in Manchester, built at a cost of £200million, is one of a number of options for New York City as a base for pre-season training. Sources say that Lampard’s loan spell will play no part in any decision of the venue for the training camp, however. Lampard was voted City’s player of the month for September by fans and has scored a number of important goals for the club. He also won a penalty against Tottenham last weekend. City boss Manuel Pellegrini said last week he was not surprised by how well Lampard has been performing. “For me it is maybe not a surprise because I know his quality,” said the City manager. “When you are the age of Frank Lampard you are not able to play three games in a week but when you have so great a player, you can resolve a lot of problems that we have during the game and I think that Frank is doing these duties at this moment. I am very happy with him.” center_img The 36-year-old missed the Champions League trip to CSKA Moscow after being carried from the field on a stretcher against Tottenham last Saturday, but his injury is not a serious one. It is understood he remains a doubt for the West Ham game with a thigh muscle injury but if he does miss the match he should be back for next week. last_img read more

Women’s lacrosse goalie named to national team

first_imgThe accolades keep coming for a women’s lacrosse team still in its infancy but already making an impact on the national stage.The latest comes with sophomore goaltender earning a spot on the U.S. national lacrosse team, announced Aug. 7, the first Trojan to do so in the program’s four years of existence.Gussie Johns will be one of five goalies on the 36-player roster to represent the U.S. in 2017. She has backstopped the Women of Troy for the season, earning MPSF All-Conference Second Team honors her freshman year.Last season, Johns was one of the best goaltenders in the country, leading the nation with her 6.04 goals-against average. In 20 starts, she went 19-0 and was tied for the MPSF lead with 49 ground balls per game. She was the MPSF Defensive Player of the Week twice and a vital contributor to the nation’s top defensive team.Head coach Lindsey Munday was the captain of Team USA in 2013 — a year when the team clinched a world championship.“We are so proud of Gussie,” Munday said. “Not only is she an immense talent, but she is an incredible person who embodies the attributes of a Trojan. She puts the team before herself and works incredibly hard both on and off the field. This selection to the national team could not be more well-deserved and is a proud moment for her, our staff and the USC program.”Also representing USC on the team will be associate head coach Devon Wills, making the team for the ninth time, and assistant coach Alyssa Leonard, who is making her third appearance. Wills already has two championships under her belt, including being named World Player of the Game in 2013.The team was announced after a three-day tryout at the national team training center in Sparks, Maryland. There were 105 players from around the country selected for the tryout. Seniors Courtney Tarleton, Kelsey Dreyer and Amanda Johansen and junior Michaela Michael were also invited from USC.Team USA coach Ricky Fried said the field was talented and tough to narrow down.However, the field will be sliced in half to 18 players by the time actual competition starts for the national team. The team of 36 will train for the Federation of International Lacrosse Women’s World Cup next year in Guildford, England.last_img read more

China Promises to Ante Up Nuclear-Monitoring Data

first_imgAfter North Korea announced that it had conducted its third nuclear test in February, few doubted the regime had pulled it off: Seismic signals registered around the world clearly showed that a massive explosion had occurred. In the hours after the blast, the U.S. military and others scrambled to catch whiffs of radioxenon leaking from the test site that might indicate whether North Korea had detonated a plutonium bomb or a uranium bomb. Identifying the fissile material would help intelligence agencies size up North Korea’s nuclear arsenal. To the frustration of the United States and its allies, however, too few radioxenon atoms were detected to make that determination.Next time may be a different story. Yesterday, the world’s main nuclear weapons monitoring organization announced that China has agreed to begin sharing data from 10 stations on its territory. Seven stations register seismic waves and infrasound waves; three stations in Beijing, Lanzhou, and Guangzhou detect radionuclides.  Data from the stations would be fed into the International Data Centre (IDC) maintained by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) in Vienna. The additional information “will help us further refine our analysis” of events around the world, says CTBTO spokesperson Thomas Mützelburg. China’s radionuclide data, he says, will be especially valuable and “most welcome.” To date, 85% of CTBTO’s 337 planned monitoring stations around the world are operational.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The breakthrough came during a visit to Beijing this week by Lassina Zerbo, the new executive secretary of CTBTO’s preparatory commission. China is one of eight CTBT signatories whose ratification would bring the treaty into force; other holdouts include the United States and North Korea. (So far, 159 countries have ratified the treaty.) Analysts don’t expect China to ratify before the United States, and few are optimistic that the United States will move on the treaty any time soon, despite President Barack Obama’s pledge to do so in 2009.Observers applaud China for opening the spigot on data that would stream into the IDC. Because the CTBT has not entered into force, China, like other signatories, “has no legal obligation to provide data to anybody,” says one analyst who formerly worked in CTBTO and asked to remain anonymous. Over the past decade, as China built up its monitoring stations, it was especially leery of providing radionuclide data. “They’ve come around,” says the analyst. CTBTO now must certify the Chinese stations. “Their data would be the first step in the necessary testing and evaluation,” says Mützelburg, a process that he expects will begin “in the next couple weeks.”last_img read more