Different Virus Responses – The New York Times

first_imgWant to get The Morning by email? Here’s the sign-up.Good morning. The U.S. and Europe are responding to the latest virus waves differently, and one approach is working better than the other. Make pan-seared gyoza — Japanese dumplings filled with ground pork, cabbage, chives, ginger and garlic.What to Listen to15 new tracks by Foo Fighters, Shania Twain, Billie Eilish and more.Fine ArtA new building at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston showcases works by Latin American and Latino artists who are rarely shown in the U.S. (In Opinion, Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, a Republican former member of Congress, and Ken Salazar, Barack Obama’s former interior secretary, argue that the country should create a museum honoring American Latino history and culture on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.) “I’m sure the Europeans didn’t want to restrict their activities any more than we do,” Janet Baseman, an epidemiologist at the University of Washington, told me over the weekend. “Everyone is tired and ready for this to end, but we have to accept the reality of the data before us.”Many Americans have resisted accepting that reality. Across much of the country, restaurants remain open for indoor dining. Last week, New York State announced a new policy that public health experts consider to be a bizarre middle ground: Businesses with a liquor license can stay open until 10 p.m.- Advertisement – As you can see, both the U.S. and Europe have been coping with severe outbreaks, with caseloads rising even faster in much of Europe than in the U.S. during much of this fall. But over the past two weeks, France, Germany, Spain and Britain have managed to reduce their growth rates.- Advertisement – What is Europe doing differently? It is cracking down on the kind of indoor gatherings that most commonly spread the virus. England closed pubs, restaurants, gyms and more on Nov. 5 and announced they would remain closed until at least Dec. 2. France, Germany’s regional governments and the Catalonia region of Spain have also shut restaurants, among other businesses. Morning ReadsTrilobites: Platypuses glow under black light. Scientists have no idea why.Lives Lived: Lee Hyo-jae championed women’s rights and democracy in South Korea, helping abolish the country’s patriarchal naming system and standing up to its military dictatorship in the 1980s. She died at 95.Subscribers make our reporting possible, so we can help you make sense of the moment. If you’re not a subscriber, please consider becoming one today. The European approach seems to be working better.Look at this chart, which shows the number of new daily virus cases in five countries, adjusted for population size:center_img And the virus is now spreading so rapidly in the U.S. that keeping schools open does pose risks, including the chance that teachers, janitors and other workers infect one another. To keep schools open in a safe way, the U.S. would probably first need to close other public places. Only a few states — including Michigan, Oregon, New Mexico and Washington — have closed indoor dining recently.“The U.S. case and hospitalization numbers we’re seeing right now are chilling,” Baseman said.But if there are no perfect solutions to the pandemic, there are better and worse ones. Right now, the U.S. seems to be falling well short of what’s possible.THE LATEST NEWSThe Virus – Advertisement – At last, Princess Diana entersSince Netflix’s “The Crown” began airing in 2016, fans have excitedly anticipated Princess Diana’s character. This weekend, she arrived, in the first episode of the show’s fourth season.It covers Diana from age 16 to 28, starting in the late 1970s. Emma Corrin, in her first prominent role, is playing the part. Sarah Lyall, a former London correspondent for The Times, writes that Corrin nails “the princess’s seductive signature gesture — head tilting to the side, eyes glancing coquettishly upward through her bangs.”The portrayal is based on interviews, news media accounts and a tell-all 1992 biography by Andrew Morton. Diana made revisions to the manuscript in her own handwriting and personally approved every page, Morton has said.One new challenge for this show: A large part of its audience will have lived through the events it’s depicting, like Diana’s wedding to Prince Charles and Margaret Thatcher’s tenure as prime minister. Can the show still feel like the escape that the first three seasons were? “As always, they have taken many cinematic liberties,” Sarah writes. “‘Crown’ watchers in Britain are already debating what is accurate and what has been changed for dramatic purposes.”PLAY, WATCH, EATWhat to Cook The one indoor activity that appears to present less risk is school, especially elementary school. Why? Young children seem to spread the virus less often than adults do. “Research has shown that if you put social-distancing protocols in place, school is actually quite a safe environment,” Andreas Schleicher, who studies schools for the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development in Paris, told NPR.Closing schools and switching entirely to remote learning, on the other hand, has big social costs. Children are learning less, and many parents, mostly mothers, have dropped out of the labor force. The U.S. is suffering from both of these problems and from a raging pandemic.There are no easy answers, to be sure. Closing restaurants and other businesses creates economic hardship (which some European countries are trying to reduce through government aid). As the coronavirus has surged again in recent weeks, much of the United States has chosen to keep restaurants open and schools closed. Much of Europe has done the opposite.- Advertisement –last_img read more

Sepp Blatter welcomes Infantino’s appointment

first_imgFrom the conference hall to meet the press and the first time Gianni Infantino was put under the media microscope as President of FIFA.There will be no hiding place now for the man who is only the ninth president in the organisation’s 112-year history. The tone was one of inclusion and responsibility.“We will work tirelessly, starting from myself, through all the associations and all the staff members to make sure that we bring football back to FIFA and FIFA back to football because this is what we have to do, what we want to do and what we will do. We will restore the image of FIFA, we will make sure that everyone… everyone will be happy with what we do,” he told journalists.The result of the ballot was welcomed by many including Sepp Blatter who seemed to be trying to take a share of the glory when he said, “Gianni Infantino will now have to take over what I started, the last remaining points of the big reform package.”Gianni Infantino was been elected as the man to replace Sepp Blatter as FIFA president, winning an overall majority in the second round of voting. The Swiss-Italian edged ahead of favourite Sheikh Salman bin Ibrahim al-Khalifa in the first ballot but failed to secure the two-thirds of the vote required to secure victory.Infantino picked up 115 votes, needing just 104, to replace Sepp Blatter at the world football governing body.last_img read more

Liverpool, Man Utd fans trigger Moscow security jitters

first_imgLiverpool play Spartak Moscow on Tuesday and Manchester United plays CSKA Moscow on Wednesday, both kicking off at 1845 GMT.The head of the Russian Football Union’s security committee, Vladimir Markin, warned them to behave or face an extended stay behind bars.“I don’t want to scare anyone but I warn those who plan to come here not to support their side and see the country but to commit hooliganism: the law is the same for all, not just for Russians,” Markin told TASS state news agency on Sunday.“Those who break it will face a suitable punishment, possibly in the form of a long stay in Russia, in conditions our guests won’t like.”The influx of supporters raises the spectre of a repeat of the violence at Euro-2016 in France when street battles erupted in central Marseille ahead of the match between England and Russia on June 11 — 35 people were injured and three Russian hooligans jailed.Russia has vowed to ensure fans’ safety when it hosts the World Cup next year and has cracked down on its own hooligans who model themselves on the hooligan gangs that dogged English football in the past.For the Liverpool and Manchester United games, tightened controls will be in place at stadium entrances and nearby metro stations — as happened when Russia hosted the Confederations Cup in June and July without incident.A multi-lingual telephone help line (Fans Hotline 8-800-775-76-88) is set to open 24 hours between Monday and Wednesday to offer British fans’ legal support if needed.Both Liverpool and Manchester United have warned fans to be on their best behaviour.“You can expect there to be a visible police presence wherever groups of LFC and Man United fans congregate,” a Liverpool statement said.Manchester United called for “impeccable” behaviour from its supporters and advised them not to “attract attention” and to avoid wearing the team’s colours in public.– Risk of jail –In April, President Vladimir Putin approved new legislation toughening punishments for foreign fans responsible for crowd trouble at sports events.The legislation makes it possible to bar known foreign hooligans or those suspected of planning trouble from entering Russia.The law increases the fine for such offences to 50,000 rubles ($868, 733 euros) and also makes them punishable by up to 15 days of detention in police cells followed by deportation.After the Marseilles clashes, the Russian interior ministry’s counter-extremism division also cracked down on Russian fans, leading to more detentions and convictions.“The atmosphere at football matches has on the whole improved. You feel safer,” said one Spartak fan, who gave his name as Alexander.“Even if the number of aggressive fans hasn’t gone down, the clubs have learnt to organise matches better,” the 24-year-old said, praising a decision to reinforce crowd control using volunteers in plain clothes rather than “the police, who irritate the fans.”Nevertheless Spartak supporters fired a flare at the German referee during a match with Slovenia’s Maribor earlier in September.UEFA fined the Russian club 60,000 euros and banned it from selling tickets for its next away match.On Friday, Spartak’s Italian manager Massimo Carrera urged fans “not to repeat such actions,” TASS reported.“I hope that they will take seriously the risk of not being allowed into the stadium next time,” Carrera said.Ahead of the World Cup, Russia wants to avoid a repeat of serious fan violence seen in the past.In 2002, after Russia was knocked out of the World Cup by Japan, fans watching on an outdoor screen near the Kremlin went on a rampage, killing one and wounding dozens, and setting cars on fire.In 2010, thousands of fans rioted on the street after a Spartak supporter was shot dead in a fight between members of Russian and North Caucasus ethnic groups.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000The head of the Russian Football Union’s security committee has warned Liverpool and Manchester United fans to behave during their respective matches in Moscow this week © AFP/File / Natalia KOLESNIKOVAMOSCOW, Russian Federation, Sep 25 – As thousands of British fans head to Moscow for Champions League matches involving Manchester United and Liverpool, Russia faces a crucial test of its security measures just months ahead of the 2018 World Cup.Some 2,000 British fans are expected to arrive for matches on Tuesday and Wednesday against Moscow teams known for problems with hooliganism and racism in the stands.last_img read more

DELIGHT AS DONEGAL MAN WINS SECOND GOLD MEDAL AT TRANSPLANT GAMES

first_imgA Donegal man has won another medal at the European Transplant & Dialysis Sports Championships in Poland today.Kieran Murray from Ramelton, won his second gold medal at the 8th European Transplant & Dialysis Games in Krakow.Kieran, a kidney transplant recipient, won a Gold medal in the Golf singles event. Earlier in the week he also secured a Gold in the 5km mini marathon.Kieran said after his win today, “It was absolutely brilliant, I am delighted with the result and proud of my two Gold medals at my first ever Transplant Games. I thank my donor for giving me the chance to compete here in Krakow.” DELIGHT AS DONEGAL MAN WINS SECOND GOLD MEDAL AT TRANSPLANT GAMES was last modified: August 20th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:donegalKieran MUrrayPOLANDRameltonTransplant Gameslast_img read more