Samuels elated with vital Scorpions win

first_imgBRIDGETOWN, Barbados, (CMC): Jamaica Scorpions head coach Robert Samuels believes his side has gained valuable momentum with their ‘vital’ win over tournament favourites Barbados Pride here Thursday night. Previously unbeaten in six outings, Pride slumped to a 74-run defeat in the day and night contest at Kensington Oval, as Scorpions in turn won their fourth straight to build up a head of steam ahead of next week’s Regional Super50 semi-finals in Antigua. “It (the win) was very vital. You do not want to lose twice to any team in the semi-finals,” said the former Test batsman. “Barbados beat us in the first game. I thought we should have won that game, scoring 191. They got there with just one wicket [left]. Today, we scored 250, and I thought it was enough. “I must give Barbados credit. They bowled very well in the middle overs [especially] the two spinners (Ashley Nurse and Jomel Warrican) … and they pulled us back. At one stage it looked as if we would have scored 400, but Nurse bowled extremely well.” Scorpions started the tournament with a shock defeat to Combined Campuses and Colleges Marooners and lost their second when they narrowly went down to Pride six days later. Since then, Scorpions have hardly missed a step, and Samuels said it had been important to get the early jitters out of the way before the knockout round. “In competitions like this you will lose one and you do not want to lose one in the semi-finals or the final so to get that one out of the way [was important],” Samuels pointed out. “We took CCC for granted … fortunately or unfortunately, we played CCC at their home ground which they knew better than us and we took it for granted, became complacent and we lost.” Since then, Scorpions stepped up their game, with their batsmen especially finding their touch. In their last four outings, they have cracked 250 three times and got 204 in the other game. Scorpions, who lie second in the Group B standings behind leaders Pride, face ICC Americas in their final game at Windward Cricket Club today.last_img read more

Caribou habitat restoration may be ineffective in the short term, says UBC study

first_imgVANCOUVER — A new study done in northeastern Alberta suggests habitat restoration may not be enough to save threatened woodland caribou, at least in the short term, and researchers at the University of British Columbia say their results make the case for a more rigorous analysis of conservation methods.Much of the caribou habitat in Western Canada has already been degraded by industrial activities, such as oil and gas exploration, so one of the key tools being used to protect caribou is habitat restoration, said Cole Burton, the senior author of the study and a forestry professor who leads the wildlife coexistence lab at the university. But wildlife responses to habitat restoration are often assumed rather than verified, the study says.- Advertisement -“We can’t just accept on faith that things are working,” Burton said in an interview on Wednesday.The researchers set out to monitor caribou and their predators, such as black bears and wolves, as well as other prey like moose and white-tailed deer in both restored and unrestored habitat areas between 2015 and 2018.In northeastern Alberta, they placed hidden cameras along seismic lines — narrow strips of land cleared for oil and gas exploration. They fragment caribou habitat and facilitate the movement of predators, disrupting a natural separation and increasing the predation of caribou, Burton said.Advertisement In October, the province announced it was allocating $6.5 million over three years for caribou habitat restoration projects, including planting trees, spreading woody debris and installing fences to disrupt the thoroughfares that advantage predators.But trees grow back slowly in the northern Boreal forest, which means caribou habitat restoration is a long-term process, Burton said.A spokesperson for the B.C. Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development said it is reviewing the study to determine if and how its findings could be applied to the province’s caribou recovery strategy. The ministry also said the recovery program is closely monitored to determine whether it’s meeting caribou recovery goals.More immediate measures, such as maternity penning where pregnant caribou are protected by a fence as well as predator culling, are also part of the B.C. government’s strategy to protect threatened caribou.Burton said it’s likely the province will have to pursue a predator cull, which is contentious, for a long time until caribou habitat recovers more fully.Advertisement The study, which was published last week in the journal Biological Conservation, showed that most predators and prey used the restored seismic lines about as much as they used the unrestored lines.Caribou preferred to use more isolated lines and those around low-lying wetland areas, regardless of whether the lines had been restored. Only white-tailed deer were observed using the restored lines less than the unrestored ones, the study found.The researchers monitored lines that had been restored three to six years before the study as part of an effort by members of the Canadian Oil Sands Innovation Alliance, or COSIA, to reclaim 570 square kilometres of caribou habitat along the Athabasca River about 70 kilometres southwest of Fort McMurray, Alta.In addition to tree planting, restoration can also include the development of mounds of earth and piles of fallen logs and debris to try to break up the movement and sight lines of predators.Advertisement “If we’re going to keep caribou around, we really do need to think about what vision are we going to keep them in,” said Burton.“Are we going to put them in a little fenced area until we finish developing and restoring the landscape and just hope that they survive? Or are we going to have a vision where we have more substantial protection of their habitat?”Brenna Owen, The Canadian Press Deterring predators with so-called movement blockers requires substantial effort and modification of the landscape, said Burton, who noted it’s possible that intensifying these efforts could help break up seismic lines more effectively.The lines Burton and his team studied in Alberta were developed around the 1980s.“Since that time, industry has tried to change their methods to what they would call low-impact seismic lines, so much narrower (and) maybe not as straight, so they break up the line of sight of the predators, like wolves,” said Burton. COSIA could not immediately be reached for comment.The same issues are happening in northeastern B.C., where woodland caribou also roam alongside seismic lines established for oil and gas exploration, Burton said.Advertisementlast_img read more

LOCAL NEWS: LIFFORD/CLONLEIGH RESOURCE CENTRE NOTES

first_imgBLOSSOMS – APPEAL: We are appealing to the public to donate any unwanted quality items to the centre. We also require the help of volunteers in order to keep the shop up and running. If you have any time to spare, would like to give something back to the community or would like to gain or improve your skills or just meet new people for a few hours per week, please contact reception on 074 91 41773!• WRITING GROUP: If you have an interest in staring stories or jokes, then you or someone you know may be interested in coming along to our classes. This is not an accredited course but participants come along to meet new people and just have a laugh. If you would like to find out more, please contact reception on 07491 41773. • PHOTOGRAPHY: The Resource Centre will are hoping to run a class in photography in the near future. If you have an interest in the above, would like to take up a new hobby or just get out and meet new people then call reception on 07491 41773.• BASIC/CONVERSATIONAL IRISH: We are hoping to run classes in the Irish Language. This may be of benefit to people wishing to refresh their memory of the language, help their children with schoolwork or someone who just wishes to find out more about our native language. Please contact reception on 074 91 41773 for further information.• ART CLASSES: Beginning Monday 4th February from 10.30 – 12.30p.m. Anyone interested in attending please contact reception on 07491 41773.• COMPUTERS: Classes in intermediate and beginners held weekly at the Lifford Clonleigh Resource Centre. For further information please contact 074 91 41773. •   LOCAL NEWS: LIFFORD/CLONLEIGH RESOURCE CENTRE NOTES was last modified: January 30th, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:LIfford/ClonleighResource centre noteslast_img read more