Pirates lift Carling Black Label Cup

first_imgPenalty shootoutAnd so it came down to a penalty shootout. Bafana Bafana netminder Itumeleng Khune came close to saving Pirates’ first penalty kick, but Oupa Manyisa’s effort had just enough height to beat the diving goalie. Pirates’ skipper Lucky Lekgwathi put the pressure back on Chiefs when he scored to make it four-three in favour of the Buccaneers. 1 August 2011 It was clear, however, that this was a pre-season clash and with some players in unfamiliar positions the sharpness needed to finish off moves was absent. Siphiwe Tshabalala levelled for the Amakhosi before Happy Jele made it two-one to Pirates. It was two-all when Parker sent Josephs the wrong way. It remained two-all when Doutie missed for Pirates and Ritchie missed for Chiefs when his shot struck the bar. Successful penalties by Rooi Mahamutsa and Geraldo Sibeko then brought the teams level at three-all. Shortly after that Mark Mayembela created a fine chance for Pirates when he rounded the Chiefs’ defence down the right flank, but his cross to Chiukep Msowoya was at a difficult height and the striker could only knock the ball over the crossbar with a shot off his thigh. The fans then made the substitutions they wanted by voting by SMS. Msowoya was replaced by Sameehg Doutie, while Chiefs’ striker Sthembiso Ngcobo made way for Bafana Bafana forward Bernard Parker, who made his debut for the Amakhosi to the loud blaring of vuvuzelas. He told the PSL: “It was a friendly game. The team was chosen by the fans and we had a new coach,” he said of the fan that won the opportunity to manage the team on the day. “The coach (fan) was very serious about his tactics, he even told us about the substitutions before the game. It was funny, and fun, all the guys had a good laugh at the pre-match meeting.” DeniedEarly in the second half Josephs denied Abia Nale a goal by leaving his line and closing down the space after Nale had been sent clear by Tinashe Nengomasha. DownplayedChiefs’ defender Dominic Isaacs downplayed his side’s loss to Pirates, which came on the back of a defeat to the Buccaneers in the Vodacom Challenge. Chiefs created a couple of half-chances, but Keegan Ritchie fired wildly over the top after a goalmouth scramble and Nengomasha came close with a snap shot that passed just wide of the goalkeeper’s left hand post. In the fourth minute, striker Lucky Khune found the back of the Buccanneers’ net, but his effort was disallowed because of a blatant hand ball which knocked the ball past goalkeeper Moneeb Josephs. Instead of getting on the scoresheet, Khune went into referee Victor Hlungwani’s book after being shown a yellow card. Late kick offKick off was delayed by half-an-hour because of the late arrival of many fans, but it didn’t seem to have affected the players as the game got off to a fast and controversial start. Ultimately, Pirates triumphed four-three from the penalty spot in a game which revealed why coaches select teams and not fans; what was missing from the line-ups was balance and it showed in the side’s performances. Not that passion and industry was missing from a clash between the Soweto rivals, it wasn’t. The fans selected the players and made the substitutions, but that wasn’t enough to produce goals as Orlando Pirates and Kaizer Chiefs went to a penalty shootout after the Carling Black Label Cup finished in a goalless draw at FNB Stadium in Johannesburg on Saturday. Chiefs’ goalkeeper Itumeleng Khune stepped up to take his side’s fifth penalty, but it was a miserable effort, fired way over the crossbar and Pirates had won the Carling Black Label Cup. Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

South African HIV/Aids research pioneer Glenda Gray on 2017 Time’s 100 Most Influential list

first_imgDr Glenda Gray, the pioneering medical researcher, who specialises in the search for a vaccine for HIV/Aids, is the only South African to be selected as one of Time magazine’s prestigious 100 most influential people in 2017.Dr Glenda Gray, selected as one of 2017’s Most Influential people by Time magazine, is a pioneering medical researcher dedicated to finding an HIV vaccine. Gray has been at the forefront of HIV/Aids treatment and advocacy in South Africa for more than 30 years. (Image: South African Medical Research Council)CD AndersonDr Glenda Gray joins previous South African Time100ers such as comedian Trevor Noah, former Public Protector Thuli Madonsela and tech entrepreneur Elon Musk. This year’s list includes US presidential adviser Ivanka Trump, Russian President Vladimir Putin, humanitarian Melinda Gates and singer Kendrick Lamar.Gray is the president and CEO of the South African Medical Research Council (SMRC), and also leads a group of internationally acclaimed medical researchers giving hope to people living with HIV/Aids. Its landmark contribution is the development and implementation of a pioneering HIV vaccine efficacy trial that has been running over the past seven years.This programme seeks to develop an effective and affordable HIV vaccine regimen in South Africa that, if successful, could be the first HIV vaccine to be licensed globally.Speaking to News24 about her work, Gray says: “I [believe] if we find a solution to HIV, we will find it in South Africa. As a county we have come a long way with many breakthroughs over the years.”In the Time profile, editor Siobhan O’Conner calls Gray a dedicated and passionate pioneer, and highlights her research that led to a dramatic drop in mother-to-child HIV transmission and babies born with the virus — from 600,000 a year to 150,000. Part of Gray’s leadership in ongoing research and medical trials is the development of an early infant inoculation system.“[Gray’s] ongoing HIV vaccine study is the largest of its kind ever conducted in South Africa, and with it, Gray is once again doing her part to make sure that the science of HIV — and the conversation around it — never stops evolving,” writes O’Conner.The doctor’s courageous drive and fearlessness in questioning the status quo was, according to her official SMRC biography, developed by her tireless work in fighting against apartheid. During the 1980s Gray was at the forefront of calling for the desegregation of the country’s hospitals and allowing access to medical treatment for all South Africans. After 1994, Gray worked closely with Nelson Mandela’s first democratic government in tackling the growing HIV/Aids problem.She founded South Africa’s first perinatal HIV clinic in 1993, offering testing and counselling facilities for pregnant women in townships. The clinic, together with the University of the Witwatersrand, was also at the forefront of HIV/Aids research. Later, Gray campaigned vigorously for cost-effective HIV treatments for developing countries.In 2001, Gray and others helped to form the Treatment Action Campaign (TAC), which fought tirelessly for the distribution of treatment to HIV-positive pregnant women in South Africa. In 2002, alongside her colleague Dr James McIntyre, she received the Nelson Mandela Health and Human Rights Award for their research. In presenting the award to Gray and her team, Mandela recognised that “beyond doubt and argument” that giving drugs to pregnant women was central to the fight against HIV/Aids.In 2003, Gray and McIntyre were honoured with a Heroes in Medicine Award by the International Association of Physicians in Aids Care.She was also awarded South Africa’s highest national honour, the Order of Mapungubwe (Silver) in 2013 for both her activism during apartheid and her pioneering medical research.While the work of the TAC with the South African government has enabled more than 2 million South Africans with HIV/Aids to receive treatment, Gray has refocused her research efforts on developing effective vaccines for the virus, particular for enabling infected mothers to be able to breastfeed infants. Her current work is focusing on developing a vaccine that works for adults and children.“Once we find a vaccine that works, and we put it to infants, I would have completed my cycle, my journey,” she said. “I want to be part of that team that finds an HIV vaccine. I believe we will find it.”Regarding the Time 100 honour, Gray paid tribute to those around her who had been part of the trailblazing work, telling News24 on 21 April 2017: “I wouldn’t be here if it weren’t for my team and the people I work with. So, it’s not just about me, I happen to represent a team that very much deserves this as much as I do… we can’t rest. We will find a solution. I might symbolise hope and passion, but it is the hard work of a whole team of people that will ultimately make a difference.”For a full timeline of the life and work of Dr Glenda Gray, read this 2014 profile.Source: News24, South African Medical Research Council, Wikipedia Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

U.P. police to set up ‘Digital Armies’

first_imgTo curb incidents of lynching and violence due to fake news on social media, the Uttar Pradesh police will set up ‘Digital Armies’ of prominent residents to keep a vigil on inflammatory posts and rumour-mongering. As part of the initiative, all the 1,469 police stations in the State will have a WhatsApp group consisting 250 members including ex-servicemen, teachers, doctors, advocates and journalists among others, U.P. Director General of Police O.P. Singh said. These ‘digital volunteers’ will inform their local police station if they come across fake news on the social media and at the same time, disseminate correct information among the locals to curb the spread of rumours, he added. “The group members will share with the police various information, rumours, photographs and videos of their respective area,” Mr. Singh said. “Each of the 1,469 police station will be having the digital volunteers linked through WhatsApp. The group operating at the police station level will be linked to the district WhatsApp group, which would be linked to the U.P. DGP,” he added. On one hand, social media has ushered in communication revolution, while on the other, anti-social elements misuse it to spread rumours by spreading fake news, photographs and videos, Mr. Singh noted. The move comes in the wake of the Central government’s directions to take effective steps to stop the spread of the rumours and fake news, he said. According to the State police, the application forms to become a digital volunteer are available on their website uppolice.gov.in. A district level committee under the SP will select the volunteers and at least two of them will be selected from each ward, locality and village.last_img read more

10 months agoFulham plan bid for Bournemouth striker Lys Mousset

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Fulham plan bid for Bournemouth striker Lys Moussetby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveFulham are eyeing Bournemouth striker Lys Mousset.Fulham are planning a January move for Mousset, says West London Sport.The French striker has struggled to make an impact with the Cherries but could now be handed a lifeline by their Premier League rivals.Fulham are looking to strengthen as they prepare for a relegation scrap after a tough start to the season.The French frontman has made just seven top-flight starts since joining the Dorset club from Le Havre for around €6.5m some two and a half years ago.He has scored four goals, two of which were in the league. last_img read more

9 months agoDONE DEAL: Stevenage sign West Ham midfielder Moses Makasi

first_imgTagsTransfersLoan MarketAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say DONE DEAL: Stevenage sign West Ham midfielder Moses Makasiby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveStevenage have signed West Ham midfielder Moses Makasi on loan until the end of the season.The 23-year-old, who is yet to make his senior debut for the Hammers, spent time on loan with Plymouth last season scoring once in seven appearances.He could feature for Boro in Saturday’s home game against Crawley.”Moses is a good footballer and I am really pleased we have been able to get this one over the line,” boss Dino Maamria told the club website. last_img read more

Metis musician Nelson Little releases second album

first_imgAPTN National NewsManitoba Metis musician Nelson Little releases second album – Ain’t afraid of the truthIt’s described as a raw, gritty country album that uses real life situations to bring a message through music.APTN’s Shaneen Robinson has the story.last_img

Agency built pen for possible horse slaughter

first_imgRENO, Nev. — The U.S. Forest Service has built its first corral for wild horses, a Northern California facility that could allow it to bypass federal restrictions and sell the animals for slaughter.The agency acknowledged in recent court filings that it built the pen for mustangs gathered in the fall on national forest land along the California-Nevada border because horses held at other federal facilities cannot be sold for slaughter.The Forest Service denies claims by horse protection advocates that it has made up its mind to sell the more than 250 horses for slaughter. But it also says it may have no choice because of the high cost of housing the animals and the continued ecological impacts it claims overpopulated herds are having on federal rangelands.The agency’s new pen is in the Modoc National Forest, about 170 miles (273 kilometres) northwest of Reno.Scott Sonner, The Associated Presslast_img read more

Officials searching for accident after finding injured person in Pine Pass

first_imgUPDATE- RCMP have located the vehicle and no one was in the vehicle. The female motorist was taken to the hospital and the incident is being investigated by the RCMP.Rescue trucks are returning home at this time.CHETWYND, B.C. – The Chetwynd and Mackenzie Rescue Trucks along with the RCMP and the BC Ambulance Crew from Mackenzie are searching for the site of a motor vehicle accident in the area of Azouzetta Lake Lodge & Campground and Powder King after an injured person has been found alongside the road. Emergency crews do not know if a passenger or passengers are still in a vehicle since the injured person cannot speak and is seriously injured.If you are travelling in this area, please look closely for any sign of an accident and report immediately to police-fire-ambulance personnel or call 911 with precise details. This is an emergency and an ongoing story.—last_img read more

Trade minister Carr betting on LNG to unlock trade in China and

first_img“I would say there are lots of possibilities for sectoral trade. We know the LNG possibility is real. We know that the Chinese Canadian community is very interested in deepening ties.”The distinction Carr makes is significant. An attempt to launch formal free trade talks last winter stalled because Chinese leaders flatly rejected the Trudeau government’s progressive trade agenda that would have included labour, gender and Indigenous rights.And then there’s that surprise clause in the new USMCA. It requires a member country to provide notice and information to the other two partners if it plans free trade talks with a “non-market” economy. It gives the other partners a say in the text of such a deal.The Chinese embassy in Ottawa blasted the inclusion of the new clause because it unfairly targets China’s potential trading partners, and unfairly brands it as a “ non-market” economy. Carr is so buoyant about the door-opening possibilities of shipping cleaner energy across the Pacific that he categorically discounts the effect of another surprise on the trade file this past week.He sees no obstacle in the controversial clause in the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement that allows any of the countries to withdraw from the deal on six-months notice if one of the partners enters into a free trade agreement with a non-market economy, China, again.“There’s nothing in the trade agreement with Mexico and the United States that stops Canada from that. The deal has no impact on Canadian sovereignty or the capacity of the Canadian government to do business around the world,” Carr said.Carr’s job is to find new trading markets for Canada beyond its largest trading partner, the United States. The word “diversification” was conspicuously added to his job title during a July cabinet shuffle and the minister is clearly thrilled with what he sees as the LNG arrow in his quiver.Given the rocky, insult-laden, 14-month road to a new North American trade deal, the need to fulfil the promise of diversification has never been greater for Canada. Carr is also eyeing India, South America, and other Asian countries, as well as pushing for the speedy ratification of the new Trans-Pacific Partnership.He is hoping to travel to China next month, though he stops short of calling for all-out free trade with the country that is the subject of so much Trump administration ire. OTTAWA, O.N. – Jim Carr’s view of enhancing Canadian trade in Asia _ and its biggest prize, China _ is rosier these days because he’s seeing the possibilities through a new lens: LNG Canada’s new $40-billion liquefied natural gas project in northern B.C.“The most interesting development in Canada’s relationship with China happened (Tuesday),” the new minister of international trade diversification said in an interview one day after the historic announcement to build the long-awaited LNG plant in Kitimat, B.C.“What we’ll be able to say to our potential customers is that this now is real and there will be timetables.”center_img Trade experts and analysts support the careful approach that Carr advocates because it gives Canada room to talk to China without overtly angering the United States.“The Americans may still take notice but there’s nothing to stop Canada from continuing to have productive conversations with the Chinese in areas that we have common interests,” said Meredith Lilly, a trade expert at Carleton University.Lilly said the non-market economy clause is unusual and represents a new way for the Trump administration to force its allies to “pick sides” in its ongoing trade dispute with China that has seen billions of dollars of tariffs imposed on Chinese goods, and retaliation by Beijing.“You can view those as targeted at China, and the U.S. creating a template for future trade agreements with other countries beyond Mexico and Canada,” said Lilly.Derek Burney, who was a key player in the Brian Mulroney government that negotiated the original Canada-U.S. free trade deal, said he’s not convinced the clause has any teeth to prevent Canada from moving forward economically with China, which he urged the government to do “as assertively” as possible.“We have misfired in our approaches to China thus far. We have to redouble those efforts and get more serious, and not just with China, but with India as well,” he said.“China’s going to be the No. 1 economy in a number of years, not decades. We’ve got to take it more seriously.”Burney said business needs to do more to find opportunities to capitalize on the major trade deals that Canada has already completed with the European Union and South Korea, among others, as well as the new TPP that the Trudeau government hopes to ratify this fall.“I don’t see as much evidence yet of our companies taking advantage of the openings that those agreements are giving us,” said Burney. “The biggest handicap in Canada is complacency. We’ve become comfortable in the cocoon of dealing with the Americans for 75 percent of our trade.”Carr is anything but complacent.A full legislative effort is being made to ensure the rebooted TPP will be ratified this fall, giving Canada so-called first-mover advantage by being among the first six counties in the 11-country Pacific Rim pact to benefit. Meanwhile, Canada’s battalion of 1,000 trade commissioners and a newly created Invest in Canada agency are pushing hard on all fronts, said Carr.“All of it plays to the heart of our strategic investment, which is to safeguard the most important trading relationship for Canada, which we have done while expanding possibilities, which we are doing.”(THE CANADIAN PRESS)last_img read more

Protester climbs into tree near BC marine terminus of Trans Mountain pipeline

first_imgBURNABY, B.C. – A mid-air protest has begun in British Columbia at the western end of the Trans Mountain pipeline, which carries oilsands crude from Alberta to a port in Metro Vancouver.Stand Earth spokesman Sven Biggs says 71-year-old grandfather Terry Christenson has climbed a tree inside the Westridge Marine Terminal, which is the facility where oil would be loaded onto tankers in a planned expansion of the pipeline.This is the second protest for Christenson, who was arrested in March 2018 after climbing a tree in the same area to slow clearing for the pipeline construction. “Canada is already on the path to clean energy and we must continue to diversify our economy, not build more dirty pipelines. I’m here today to ensure Prime Minister Justin Trudeau hears this message loud and clear,” Christenson says. Christenson’s first protest lasted 16 hours before he was removed, but Biggs says the professional mountain climber has enough supplies to remain in his new perch for a week.Stand Earth says about 230 people were arrested last year for violating an injunction against protests at the marine terminal and other nearby infrastructure linked to the Trans Mountain pipeline.The federal government supports the tripling of the pipeline’s capacity but suspended work on the expansion last August when the Federal Court of Appeal found parts of a National Energy Board review were flawed and should be redone.Biggs says Christenson’s protest could be the start of many more.“It’s a message to Justin Trudeau and his cabinet who are right now considering whether or not to re-approve the pipeline. If they do that, I think they are going to see a lot more actions like this mornings’,” Biggs says.A statement sent by Christenson, through Stand Earth, says climate change will affect everyone and today’s protest is on behalf of his grandchildren, and grandchildren around the world.last_img read more