Keep Austin Weir’d: Bob Weir Awarded Key To The City Of Austin For His “Vote Local” Initiative

first_imgThis weekend, Bob Weir took to Austin, Texas, to continue his Campfire Tour with his Campfire Band with two shows at The Moody Theater for Austin City Limits Live. Before his first performance on Saturday, the Grateful Dead guitarist met with Austin’s Mayor, Steve Adler, to talk about his “Vote Local” initiative. This newest project is in conjunction with HeadCount, an organization that advocates for musicians and music lovers to get more involved in politics and for which Weir is a board member. After Saturday’s meeting, Weir kicked off the first of two nights at Moody Theater with the Campfire Band featuring Steve Kimock, Jash Kaufman, Jon Shaw, and The National’s Aaron Dessner, Bryan Devendorf, and Scott Devendorf. This most tour has been in support of Weir’s recent solo album, Blue Mountain, which was released during the tail-end of last year. You can check out pictures from Weir’s mayoral meeting below, as well as setlists from Saturday’s and Sunday’s performances. [H/T JamBase]last_img read more

Pope may support same-sex unions, but that doesn’t mean the Vatican does

first_imgThe disclosure this week of Pope Francis’ support of same-sex civil unions sent shockwaves through the Catholic Church and progressive and conservative circles alike. It came in a papal interview in “Francesco,” a documentary that premiered Wednesday, and represented a major break with Vatican teaching, leaving many wondering whether an official change might be coming soon. In the film Francis says, “What we have to create is a civil union law. That way they are legally covered.” The Gazette spoke with Francis X. Clooney, S.J., Parkman Professor of Divinity and professor of comparative theology, about the pope’s comments and what they mean for members of the Catholic LGBTQ community. Q&AFrancis X. ClooneyGAZETTE:  What was your reaction when you heard about the pope’s comments on same-sex unions?CLOONEY: On the one hand, it’s not surprising at all, because Archbishop Bergoglio [now Pope Francis] struggled with the issue of formal marriage relationships when he was in Argentina and pointed to a compromise such as calling same-sex unions civil unions and not marriage. This debate is similar to what we went through in this country a decade or so ago. But I think Francis’ openness to same-sex unions is also more fundamentally representative of his instinct that human beings have a right to be together, a right to union, a right to family, and therefore, that it would be unjust to provide no way at all for people to live together as a couple. I think it’s his basic sense of human compassion and his openness to finding ways to help people to live the lives that they feel they must live.On the other hand, you can’t imagine previous popes speaking in this fashion. That doesn’t mean that someone like John Paul was not a compassionate person, but they were so clearly linked to, focused on, church doctrine, and the preservation of marriage between a male and a female and, given their attitudes toward homosexuality, they simply wouldn’t speak in this fashion, whatever they may personally have felt. And I think what is new here is that Francis, as all the reports say, is in the non-authoritative context of a documentary — not sitting on the chair of Peter as pope making a proclamation ­— speaking his mind as probably most Catholics in the West would also speak their minds and say, “Well yes, some kind of way to allow people to live their lives happily and in peace is what matters.”GAZETTE:  Does this change anything about the church’s overall doctrine?CLOONEY: Probably not, because he hasn’t pushed it that far in terms of recognizing gay marriages. But implicitly, it’s undercutting the rhetoric that being gay is a grave disorder or that being gay and living out a gay commitment is something that God disapproves of. Francis is taking a positive attitude and therefore changing the climate, even if there are going to be Catholics who resist this greatly.GAZETTE:  I know Bishop Thomas J. Tobin in Providence, R.I., has come out very strongly against this. Do you expect an even greater backlash from conservative and other voices in the church?CLOONEY: Yes, but not as much as one might think. This news is based on a documentary, and it’s in keeping with things Francis has said previously. Conservative critics are not going to be surprised by this, even if they will be very annoyed by it. People who are against any compromise in this direction will see this as another sign that Francis has gone astray, that he is not adhering to church teaching. And they will add this to their list of complaints about him, even though he’s the pope and deserving of their respect. You may recall much earlier in his papacy, when people asked him about his thoughts on homosexuality, he said “Who am I to judge people in their lives?” This is Francis, and for many, this is a wonderful Francis; but for some, it’s the Francis they can’t abide, and they will continue to protest.GAZETTE:  Can you see him pressing this forward to doctrinal change?CLOONEY: Several years ago, when there was discussion with the pope and some of the bishops about divorced and remarried Catholics returning to Communion, Francis didn’t bite the bullet and declare that they’re welcome back to Communion if they’re in a stable second marriage. But he said that good priests, who know how to be pastoral, will know how to relate to people. It was as if to say: If a couple who are divorced and remarried comes to you, you’ll help them to find their way. My sense is that Francis is not the man as pope, particularly going on 10 years into his papacy, to be making declarations that push the church where it’s not ready to go. But rather, again, he is giving a green light, really, to priests and others involved in counseling couples to say we have to find ways to welcome Catholics as they are: Be pastoral; be like Jesus. And I think this opens the door, even though it will be controversial in some circles, to saying couples who are in a same-sex marriage are members of the parish and welcome in Catholic worshipping communities. Of course, in some dioceses, such couples will not be welcome to Communion. There will be differences in response and pastoral practice. So I think what is at stake is a kind of incremental pastoral disposition, whereby things will change, as they always have, only slowly. The pope is saying things that other popes never would have said previously. But I don’t see Francis being in the position to make any kind of daring pronouncement in the years to come about gay marriage. I wouldn’t anticipate that coming.,GAZETTE:  Does this kind of comment potentially set the stage for another Vatican council?CLOONEY: Well, there have certainly been calls for a coming Vatican III. I think there’s a sense that some 50 or 60 years after the last council, which opened things up, there’s a need to consolidate and catch up to where things are in the world around us now. How much has changed since 1965! Some, who still regret the way Vatican II was implemented, will also want to have a Vatican III, if not turn back the clock, rather to tighten things up under a more conservative pope. In a sense it’s like calling a constitutional convention in this country: Liberals and conservatives would see such a convention as to their advantage. But I think all this depends first of all on how long Francis is pope. He’s not said he’s going to retire, but he seems to be the kind of man who would be sensible enough to say, “If I can’t do the job, I will retire,” even if he hasn’t said that yet. So then it will also depend on who the next pope would be.GAZETTE:  Do you have a sense of whether the church is on a more liberal trajectory in terms of selecting popes?CLOONEY: Sometimes there’s this sense that if you’ve gone from Benedict on the more conservative side to Francis on the more liberal side, it could be that the cardinals look around and want a shift back a little the other way. And therefore, the next pope would be less likely to make any bold gestures. But again, in 1957 or 1958, nobody expected John XXIII, who was put in as an older caretaker pope, would suddenly call Vatican II. This knocked many cardinals off their seats, so to speak. It could be that such surprising things may happen fairly quickly.All of this is analogous to how change happens in this country with Congress and the Supreme Court making decisions, sometimes behind popular opinion, sometimes against it. But remember that Francis is in a sense a pastoral incrementalist. He believes that you’ve got to change the way we Catholics, clergy, bishops, all of us think about human decency, our responsibility to members of the church, compassion, helping people in trouble. If you change people’s minds and hearts, then the church will continue to grow in new ways. Whereas if you put in something legally that is too far ahead of where people are, it could be counterproductive.GAZETTE:  Can you talk a bit about the complexity of being the pope for a global community?CLOONEY: It’s one thing were Pope Francis the pope only of North America and Western Europe. But everything he says will be read by Catholics in South America, which is still very Catholic in many ways, and also by Catholics in more conservative Catholic communities in Africa and Asia. So going incrementally and pastorally step by step is probably Francis’s instinct, because he knows either he would infuriate Catholics in the West by not going fast enough, or anger Catholics in other parts of the world, who would say, “This is far too fast. This is out of keeping where our culture is.” In certain African countries, homosexuality is still, I think, illegal and can be punished. So saying something about same-sex marriages will be heard in one way in certain countries in Africa, and very differently in New York or Boston or London, where the response will be quite different. I think Francis has to be looking in both directions. And his basic sense is: Change our hearts, how we think as priests and bishops, and so on, and then that will be an infusion of the whole church with a new attitude slowly arriving.GAZETTE:  Could you see Pope Francis making other kinds of comments about women priests or priests being able to marry going forward?CLOONEY: Many Catholics have been hoping, with each pope for the past 50 years or so, that the pope would say something to change the dynamic on married priests and women priests, but it hasn’t happened. There has been the issue of women deacons serving in ordained ministry — there’s evidence about women deacons in the early church. But Francis, thus far into his papacy, hasn’t really changed church policy even on that. But with his “who am I to judge” comments, Francis was showing that the church is like a Red Cross station on the battlefield of life, there to help people and not to sit in an ivory tower casting judgments on people. In this way he has set a tone, which is quite clear, about wanting to have an inclusive church, wanting to have a church where people are not left out because some particularities about themselves, their self-identity.But he doesn’t seem to be the one, as more liberal Catholics would want, to say, “Let’s just ordain women deacons, period. Let’s just do it.” I think as pope, he in theory at least has the power to do that, just as Pope John Paul claimed the power for himself to stop entirely the discussion about the ordination of women, saying it’s not even to be discussed in the church anymore, period. But that didn’t work, it didn’t stop discussion. Francis could say something like that, speaking very firmly on marriage or ordination. But again, would it be wise?You think of Supreme Court decisions in this country like Roe v. Wade, and can ask whether decisions from above are the best way to change how people think about these issues. I think Francis feels the change has to come more from leaders talking to the people, listening to the people, so that ideas and sentiments seep upward through the church, not just come down from above. So I don’t think he’s going to say anything dramatic about women in the church or married priests in the church. Remember that the bishops of the Amazon region had their annual meeting just a year ago. In their document they called for married priests, arguing that they simply didn’t have enough priests, and that people have a right to Mass and the sacraments, and that the only way to do that is to ordain married men. Francis had the prerogative of issuing the final statement, and he left out reference to that request. He didn’t condemn them and say it’s impossible, but he just didn’t follow up on it. And I don’t see evidence that he’s going to suddenly start acting more boldly at this point on issues such as marriage. A positive attitude toward civil unions may well be as far as he goes.In terms of his recent comments, people who are in gay unions or gay marriages should therefore not be expecting that suddenly everything is going to be all right. But given Francis’ view of how things change, simply that he’s willing to say these things and air new ideas again and again is a big step forward. It’s not an authoritative pronouncement from Vatican City, per se. But it’s the slow change that moves things forward in a healthy way.Interview was gently edited for clarity and length.last_img read more

Mexican soldiers rescue toddler abandoned in Rio Grande

first_imgMEXICO CITY (AP) — Mexican authorities say soldiers and immigration agents have rescued a 2-year-old girl from Chile after she apparently fell into the Rio Grande and the adults who were with her left her and crossed the river into the United States. Mexico’s National Immigration Institute said Sunday that the incident happened a day earlier as a group of migrants was crossing the river near Ciudad Acuna, across from Del Rio, Texas. The agency says the adults made gestures, pointing out the toddler to soldiers and immigration agents, who waded into the river to rescue her. Officials say the adults did not stop to retrieve the girl and continued across the river. The girl has been placed with child welfare authorities.last_img read more

Become a Vendor Assessment Jedi

first_img 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by: Randy Lindberg, Founder and Managing Partner with Rivial Security (A Quantivate Partner)There are some ordinary steps that you can take to assess vendor due diligence. But, you don’t want to be ordinary…To be a Vendor Assessment Jedi, use the NIST Cybersecurity Framework!Vendor due diligence is the process of ensuring that the use of external IT service providers and other vendors does not create unacceptable potential for business disruption or negative impact on business performance.To accomplish the objective of vendor due diligence, your credit union needs to:Gather company details such as ownership specifics, company size, products offered, and locationUnderstand the company’s financial position, or rather, is this vendor financially stable enough to service your needs for at least 1 to 2 years continue reading »last_img read more

10 Life events that require financial planning

first_imgEven positive experiences might necessitate some professional helpSometimes, even the best events in life – a birth, new job or dream relocation – require a financial plan. They might necessitate the need for more insurance coverage, a new budget or guidance from a financial advisor. Here are 10 positive events that should inspire you to do some financial planning:1. The opportunity to buy a vacation home.Summer rental homes can represent bliss; a great escape you’ve had every year. Then, the landlord offers a sweet insider price you can’t refuse. Summer homes are often bought as emotions rise at the end of the season. But purchasing a vacation home – especially one that requires rental income to finance – can be a complicated long-term commitment. A financial planner, not a real estate agent, can tell you what to consider.2. You got that big raise you’ve been counting on for years.Pay raises are typically small and incremental if they come at all, so getting a big raise is cause for celebration. They also mean it’s time to do some planning to determine how much you should be saving for the future, too. It might be time to bump up your retirement savings. continue reading » 20SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

NAFCU meets with CFPB today on credit union issues

first_img 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr NAFCU President and CEO Dan Berger and staff will meet with CFPB Acting Deputy Director David Silberman today to discuss top credit union regulatory concerns and NAFCU’s suggestions for overdraft and payday lending, among other issues.Also attending today’s meeting are NAFCU Executive Vice President of Government Affairs and General Counsel Carrie Hunt, Director of Regulatory Affairs Alicia Nealon and Regulatory Affairs Counsel Alexander Monterrubio.Last week, CFPB urged the nation’s 25 largest retail banks to offer lower-risk deposit accounts to “help consumers avoid overdrafting” and issued a bulletin reminding banks and credit unions of the accurate-reporting requirements of the Fair Credit Reporting Act.Hunt responded to CFPB’s announcement saying the association supports arming consumers with information to help them make sound decisions about checking and other financial services. She also noted that credit unions already offer the types of accounts and information CFPB pushed in last week’s statements. continue reading »last_img read more

Candriam extends tobacco, coal bans to all assets

first_imgAsset manager Candriam is extending its thermal coal and tobacco exclusions policy to all its assets under management, it announced today.The exclusions had already been in place for socially responsible-invested (SRI) assets, but would now be applied to the full scope of its assets under management. This would take in all funds and segregated mandates, a spokesman noted.As of the end of June, Candriam has €113bn of assets under management across active, smart-beta, indexed and alternative strategies.The asset manager, which is a subsidiary of New York Life Company, indicated it would also be fully divesting from companies that produce chemical, biological and white phosphorous weapons. Divestments triggered by the new measure would be implemented by the end of this year, according to the manager.Companies with an “exposure level” of more than 10% to thermal coal will be affected by the exclusion, which the spokesman noted was a stricter criterion than that set by many other investors. The asset manager would ban all companies launching new coal projects.The exclusion of tobacco targeted both manufacturers and their suppliers, it said.Naïm Abou-Jaoudé, CEO of Candriam and chairman of New York Life Investment Management, said: “Coal is the most polluting energy source and the first stranded asset in an energy transition pathway, while the harmful effects of tobacco are increasingly exposed.“We recognise the important role asset managers play in tackling major global issues such as health and climate.”Vincent Hamelink, Candriam’s chief investment officer, added “health, social and environmental costs are key in a risk-return analysis”.“Extending our divestment strategy to our mainstream funds is a logical next step as investments in these companies are increasingly incompatible with our long-term risk/return objectives and our sustainability targets”.Candriam’s announcement coincides with a climate summit and the annual responsible investment conference of the Principles for Responsible Investment (PRI) in San Francisco this week.Fossil fuel divestment on the riseAccording to a report from philanthropy and impact investing firm Arabella Advisors, nearly 1,000 institutional investors with $6trn (€5trn) in assets have committed to divesting from fossil fuels, up from $52bn four years ago.Released ahead of the climate summit, the report said the recent growth was primarily driven by insurers, pension funds and sovereign wealth funds.The growing success of the divestment movement had accelerated in recent years because of “the intersection of ethical, financial and fiduciary imperatives to divest and invest,” it said.The report can be found here.last_img read more

FEPORT Looking at a More Strategic Approach

first_imgDuring a gathering in Klaipeda, the members of the Federation of European Private Port Operators (FEPORT) have discussed the strategic roadmap of the organization for the three coming years.As key assets which require a more strategic approach from national and European policy makers and regulators, the port members also commented on the adoption of the Ports Regulation in February 2017 and the General Block Exemption Regulation in May 2017.“Both texts have mobilized our membership and organization because it was crucial to avoid that those pieces of legislation have counterproductive effects on private port investments. It was a also important to make sure that they are consistent to avoid confusion or legal uncertainty,” Gunther Bonz, President of FEPORT, said.“We are satisfied with the outcome and think that both above mentioned texts and the concession Directive, which applies to Greenfield port projects, form a consistent legal framework that will allow us to invest,” Bonz added.Furthermore, he informed that “it is essential” that these three pieces of legislation are now implemented in the same way everywhere and that no extensive interpretation of provisions, for instance regarding the prolongation of existing concessions, is made.last_img read more

Stabbing lands cop in hospital

first_imgBut the motive in the incident was not immediately established. BACOLOD City – A cop was stabbed in Barangay Talubangi, Kabankalan City, Negros Occidental.Staff Sergeant John Perez, 54, of Barangay 1, Kabankalan City sustained stabbed wounds on the body, police said. Perez was brought to the Lorenzo D. Zayco District Hospital in Kabankalan City and is now in stable condition.Bautista, meanwhile, was detained in the lockup facility of the Kabankalan City police station, facing charges./PN Resident Noel Bautista, 33, was tagged suspect, the police added. According to police investigators, Perez was on duty in the area when he was stabbed by Bautista using a broken beer bottle around 9:30 a.m. on May 11.last_img read more

Lady Trojans Split Matches At JC

first_imgEC varsity & JV volleyball traveled to Jennings County on Saturday 9-26. Varsity went 1-1 on the day losing to Terre Haute North in 5 and defeating Jennings County in 3.It was a tough loss against Terre Haute North. It went 5 and all the games were long. The girls never quit and played great volleyball as a team. That has been a big focus for us in recent weeks. We needed to go back to playing as a team and we are starting to see more and more of that. It was hard to lose that match because we fought so hard, but we showed a lot of resilience and can take a lot from it.The girls bounced back well and found a way to win in 3 against Jennings County. Some of our veteran players really stepped up and showed the confidence and poise they’ve had since day one. It was a great team win.Varsity is now 14-11 on the season.Next up- all 3 teams face Milan on Thursday at EC at 5pm. This is our annual Dig Pink game, so come out and support the girls and the cause!Courtesy of Trojans Coach Cassie Laker.last_img read more